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NewsFeb 17, 2021

Assessing risk to combat COVID

Alumnus Ari Sinanis’s workplace helps the Army cope with pandemic risks

Ari Sinanis

Sgt. Ari Sinanis ’13 is in the business of assessing and minimizing risk.

Employed as a manager of JARVISS Implementations at the Boston-based software company Everbridge, Sinanis is helping the Army to stay ahead of the COVID pandemic.

JARVISS stands for Joint Analytic Real-Time Virtual Information Sharing System.

“Everbridge keeps people safe and businesses running faster,” says Sinanis, who is also acting squad leader of two teams as a combat engineer for the U.S. Army National Guard.

According to a press release from Everbridge, JARVISS gives Army analysts real-time insight into how the virus is disrupting critical infrastructure, including bases in the U.S. and abroad, hospitals, recruiting stations, Reserve and National Guard operational units, police and fire locations, and more. A custom Incident Dashboard allows users to send targeted alerts through a mobile app, text messages, emails and other modalities.

Ari Sinanis and Paul Vasconcelos at Lesley
Ari Sinanis (right) with Coach Paul Vasconcelos

“The team and I take pride in keeping safe those who protect us by providing senior leaders, antiterrorism officers, law-enforcement personnel, and emergency managers (with tools to) identify relevant threats, gain context around each threat to understand its importance, identify all assets that could be affected, and act to avoid or mitigate the impact of a risk event,” he says.

And one of the greatest threats today is the coronavirus that has killed millions worldwide.

Sinanis says the product tackles the challenges of COVID by tracking data to help the Army understand which personnel and facilities are at high risk and to respond accordingly.

“During this pandemic, JARVISS has provided critical information to state National Guard headquarters as personnel are activated and deployed to support relief efforts in all 50 states, Washington, D.C., and the U.S. territories,” the company states, adding that the product gives the Army the data it needs to quickly coordinate with local government, law enforcement, health facilities and other agencies.

“Bad things will happen, but JARVISS brings a level of preparedness to bad situations,” Sinanis says.

Ari Sinanis with fellow Guardsmen
Ari Sinanis, rear, second from left, and one of the teams he's been part of.

Lesley was certainly no bad situation for Sinanis, as it spurred the Business Management graduate to seek out internships and opportunities for leadership, such as with the university men’s soccer team, which helped him in his career.

Life at Lesley

“Lesley provided a foundation without micromanaging students,” Sinanis explains. “The small classroom allowed students to be heard and bring different perspectives to a conversation.”

The environment encouraged him to find his own path as a student, and he adds, “Finding my own way helped me mature as a student and as an adult.” 

 Though Sinanis was self-directed, he was hardly left on his own.

Paul Vasconcelos was a major reason for attending Lesley,” Sinanis says of Lesley’s soccer coach. “He was persistent and he took care of his teams. I came in at a young age and he helped me with my career.”

Sinanis also highlights former athletic director Stan Viera, past assistant coaches Mark Montgomery and James Costa.

“They all believed in me and my abilities on and off the pitch. That truly helped me grow into the person I am today,” Sinanis says. “They provided confidence and would talk to me if needed. Each played a role and have no idea how much it meant at the time.”

Sinanis also learned some profound lessons about people and places during a rigorous world geography course.

“Today, I still remember where places are geographically located and the weather patterns,” he says. “It is beneficial to know because you must be mindful of where people come from. We all come from different background but can connect through other common interests.

“Coming from different places is a good thing. You must be mindful and show a level of respect to everyone.”

Sinanis hails from Guilford, Connecticut, but resides in Everett, Massachusetts. However, he says, “Lesley is a little home for me, a familiar place that I can walk on and think of all the great memories during my time there. From White Hall to the long walks to Porter, enduring the snowstorms. Lesley will always be home to me.”