Financial Aid

A guide for post-baccalaureate certificate students.

You’ve decided to pursue higher education. Now it’s time to figure out how you’re going to pay for it.

That’s where Lesley’s Financial Aid Office can help. Use our step-by-step guide to explore funding options.

Let's get started.

International Students

International Students

If you're an international student, you are not eligible for federal or state funding, and so, you won't file the Free Application for Federal and Student Aid (FAFSA).

Learn about private loans you're eligible for.

Apply for Federal Financial Aid

Apply for Federal Financial Aid

Your eligibility for federal aid is determined by your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

So, we recommend you start there.

  • Step 1: FAFSA & Deadlines

    Begin your pursuit of all financial aid by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

    Submit the FAFSA when you apply for Lesley University admission, and each year to renew.

    Use Lesley University’s school code: 002160

    For question 29 regarding your college grade level, select "5th year/other undergraduate."

    For question 30 regarding your program of study, select "Certificate or diploma (occupational, technical or education program of less than two years)."

    Need help? Watch these videos on how to fill out the FAFSA.

  • Step 2: Additional Documents

    Submit additional documents, if asked.

    The U.S. Department of Education randomly selects 30 percent of applicants to complete a verification process.

    We’ll contact you if we need more information. Current students should check their Lesley email account.

    Once you’ve been accepted, log into your LOIS account to view your required documents under “My Documents.”

  • Step 3: Financial Aid Award Letter

    You’ll get an official Financial Aid Award letter that has:

    • Types of aid that make up your package
    • Estimated costs for your education
    • Estimated out-of-pocket costs
    • Financing options

Loans

Loans

You may be eligible for a few different types of loans. Federal loans are based on the result of your application for federal student aid (FAFSA), and appear on your financial aid award letter if you’re eligible.

Other government loan programs require additional steps to apply for them. And then there are private, non-government loans that you would research and apply for on your own.

For Washington State residents seeking information and resources about student loan repayment or seeking to submit a complaint relating to your student loans or student loan servicer, please visit www.wsac.wa.gov/loan-advocacy or contact the Student Loan Advocate at loanadvocate@wsac.wa.gov.

Here are the different types of loans and how to apply for each one.

  • Federal Direct Loans

    Federal Direct loans are provided by the U.S. Department of Education, at a fixed interest rate, to help you pay for your undergraduate or graduate education. Because they are backed by the U.S. government, the interest rates are lower than private loans.

    How to Apply

    Fill out the FAFSA. Your financial aid award letter will indicate if you’ve received a Federal Direct loan, and how much. You'll need to accept, decline, or revise (reduce) the loan through your Lesley LOIS account.

    About Federal Direct Loans

    There are 2 types of Direct Loans you could receive—Unsubsidized and Subsidized.

    Unsubsidized Loan

    • Not need-based.
    • Interest accrues while the student is enrolled in school and during the grace period.

    We recommend you pay the interest when it’s billed each quarter. Otherwise, unpaid interest will be capitalized (added to the principal balance) at the end of the grace period, making the loan more expensive.

    Subsidized Loan

    • Need-based.
    • Interest is subsidized (paid) by the U.S. government, up to a set maximum amount, while the student is enrolled at least half-time (taking 6 credits/semester) and during the grace period.

    Considerations

    Limits

    There is a limit on how much you may borrow each academic year. For post-baccalaureate certificate students, the annual loan limit varies depending on your dependency status. Dependent students can borrow a maximum of $7,500 per academic year, while independent students can borrow a maximum of $12,500. No more than $5,500 of the annual amount may be in subsidized loans. There is also a limit on how much federal loan funding you may borrow in total, called the “aggregate."

    Origination Fee

    The U.S. Department of Education deducts this fee off the top of the loan before sending funds to Lesley University on your behalf.

    Example: For a $5,000 loan with a 1 percent origination fee ($50), you’d get $4,950 to use toward your education.

    Learn More

    Learn more about Federal Direct Loans, including annual and aggregate limits, interest rates and fees, and terms and conditions.

  • Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loan

    This is a loan available to parents of dependent post-baccalaureate certificate students. Borrow funds from the U.S. Department of Education, at a fixed interest rate, to help pay for your child's education.

    To be eligible:

    • The parent is the student's biological or adoptive parent, or custodial stepparent.
       
    • The child is a dependent as determined by the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)—under 24 years old, unmarried, and have no legal dependents at the time s/he fills out the FAFSA.
       
    • The student is enrolled at least half-time (taking 6 or more credits/semester).
       
    • The parent and dependent child are U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens, and aren’t in default of any federal education loans nor owe over-payment on a federal education grant.
       
    • The parent does not have bad credit.


    How to Apply

    1. The student fill outs the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
       
    2. The parent applies for the loan online, through the U.S. Department of Education.
       
    3. If you (the parent) get the loan, and you’re a first-time borrower, you’ll need to sign a Master Promissory Note (MPN) online. Use your FSA ID to complete this step.

      If you don’t have an FSA ID, or can't remember it, request one from Federal Student Aid.


    Considerations

    You can borrow up to the total cost of your child’s education, minus other financial aid they have received.

    Origination Fee

    The U.S. Department of Education deducts this fee from the loan before they send the funds to Lesley University on your behalf.

    Example: For a $10,000 loan with a 5 percent origination fee ($500), you’d get $9,500 to use toward your education.

    Learn More

    Learn more about the Parent PLUS Loan, including interest rates, fees, repayment, and terms and conditions.

  • Private Education Loans

    Private (alternative) education loans are monies you borrow from a private lender, not from the federal government. Private loans can cover the difference between the cost of your education and the funds you received from other sources.

    Use these resources to determine the best loan product for you or your family.

    Private Loan Options

    Several private loan products are available to students and parents; however, you should research scholarships, grants, work programs, and Federal Direct Loans before borrowing from a private lender.

    Lenders are on our Private Loan List only because they have notified Lesley University that they offer private educational loans for the current academic year.


    Research your state's lending agency, local bank, or credit union.

    If you decide to use a lender or loan product not listed on the Private Loan list, notify Lesley’s Financial Aid Office so we can certify your loan of choice.

  • Federal Student Loan Repayment

    If you borrowed funds from the U.S. government for your education, there are a few ways you can pay back that loan. Federal student loans are managed by a loan servicer. Your loan servicer will help you navigate your repayment options.

    Income-Driven Repayment Plans

    Income-driven repayment plans are meant to be affordable. Your monthly payments are 10 or 15 percent of your discretionary income. This figure is calculated based on your total income, household size, and U.S. poverty guidelines.

    Each year, you’ll need to send income and household size information to your loan servicer so you can remain on this type of repayment plan.

    If your income decreases or your household size increases at any time, contact your loan servicer to get a new monthly payment amount. You don’t have to wait for the annual review.

    Learn more about income-driven repayment plans.

    Other Repayment Plans

    There are also a few repayment options—Standard, Graduated, and Extended—that aren’t based on your income, and are available to all borrowers.

    Learn more about your other options.

    Next Steps

    Work with your loan servicer to see if you qualify for an income-driven repayment plan, or to figure out which plan is best for your situation.

    Check the National Student Loan Data System for contact information for all federal loan servicers.

  • Federal Student Loan Forgiveness

    If you borrow funds from the U.S. government for your education, you may be eligible for a loan forgiveness program. This means you won’t have to pay back all of the money you borrowed.

    There are loan forgiveness programs for teachers, for public service workers, and individuals on an income-driven repayment plan.

    Teacher Loan Forgiveness

    Receive forgiveness for up to $17,500 of your Federal Subsidized or Unsubsidized student loans.

    You may be eligible if you:

    • Teach full-time; and
    • Have taught for 5 full and consecutive years in schools or educational agencies that serve low-income families.

    Learn more about Teacher Loan Forgiveness.

    Public Service Loan Forgiveness

    Receive forgiveness for the balance due on your Federal Direct student loans.

    You may be eligible if:

    • You’ve made 120 qualifying payments (10 years) on loans under certain repayment plans; and
    • You made the payments while employed full-time by a qualifying public service employer, such as a government agency or not-for-profit organization.

    The repayment plans that qualify are income-driven­, meaning your monthly payment is based on your income, household size, and the federal poverty guidelines for your area.

    Learn more about Public Service Loan Forgiveness.

    Income-Driven Repayment Loan Forgiveness

    If you don’t qualify for public service loan forgiveness, you may have another option.

    You could have your federal student loan balances forgiven if:

    • You’re on a repayment plan based on your income and household size; and
    • You’ve made payments on time for 20 or 25 years.

    Whether you qualify after 20 or 25 years depends on when you became a first-time borrower. You may need to pay income tax on the amount forgiven.

    Learn more about Income-Driven Repayment.

    Considerations

    You may qualify for the Teacher Loan Forgiveness and the Public Service Loan Forgiveness.

    However, the 5 years of employment for the Teacher Loan Forgiveness does not count toward the 10 years of employment for Public Service program.

    Next Steps

    Work with your loan servicer to see if you’re eligible for a loan forgiveness program.

    Check the National Student Loan Data System for contact information for all federal loan servicers.

  • Lender Code of Conduct

    Lesley University does not recommend any particular loan product.

    Review our Lender Code of Conduct for legal information about lending relationships.

Payment Plans

Payment Plans

Divide your tuition and fees into smaller, monthly payments through a flexible, interest-free payment plan.

You can set up a payment plan with our Student Accounts Office. Learn more about payment plans.

Financial Aid Policies

Financial Aid Policies

Lesley University is required to follow all federal and state regulations.

Review the 2 Financial Aid policies that could affect your ability to keep your federal and state financial aid while studying at Lesley.

Contact Student Financial Services

Contact Us

Gainful Employment