Workshop Titles and Descriptions

More Than 100 Workshops Over 3 Days

Sunday, October 28, 2018

  • Pre-Conference Workshops | 11:00 am–4:00 pm

    PC-1 
    Creating Inquiry Units of Study for Writers’ Workshop (Grades K-2)

    Cindy Downend, Assistant Director, Primary Programs, Lesley University Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, MA
    Julie Sneed, Primary Faculty Trainer, Lesley University for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, MA

    When you work from an inquiry stance in the writers’ workshop, you can teach students how to read and think like writers. Come and experience an inquiry unit of study as a learner. Then learn how to project an inquiry unit of study to include goals for the unit and use The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum to identify potential minilessons. You’ll also learn how to teach responsively during student conferences and the whole group share time. Finally, we will discuss how to select inquiry units of study across a school year that includes both genre and process studies.
    Required text: The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum (2016, Heinemann).

    PC-2 — Featured
    What Do You See, So What Will You Say? Making Effective Teaching Decisions in Guided Reading Lessons (Grades K-6)

    Irene Fountas, Author, Founder, Director, Professor, Lesley University's Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, Cambridge, MA
    Gay Su Pinnell, Author, Professor Emerita, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

    The goal of guided reading is to support each reader's development of a literacy processing system. As you observe each reader processing or responding to a text in a guided reading lesson, you need to consider a precise response that will support the reader's developing control of in-the head systems of strategic actions. In this institute you will look at reading behaviors of individual readers to strengthen your ability to use facilitative language that will enable the child to problem solve and build reading power. Using running records and evidence of student talk and writing about reading, you will sharpen your ability to respond to the learner in the moment to expand literacy competencies.
     
    Required Text: Participants are required to bring Fountas & Pinnell Prompting Guide, Part 1 for Oral Reading and Early Writing and Prompting Guide, Part 2 for Comprehension to engage in the experiences of the institute. These are available for purchase prior to the institute if needed. (Heinemann).

    PC-3 — Featured
    What Are the REST of My Kids Doing? Fostering Independence in the K-2 Reading Workshop

    Lindsey Moses, Associate Professor, Author, Arizona State University, AZ
    This pre-conference institute provides support and structures for facilitating meaningful independence in the K-2 reading workshop. Teachers often worry about the value of what young readers are doing independently while they are conferring or working with small groups. This institute helps educators move away from unsupported independent reading and busy­work responses! Ideas for scaffolding, monitoring, refining, and deepening student-directed literacy experiences will be introduced. Research-based principles guide the practical ideas that will be presented with classroom examples and videos..

    PC-4
    Close Reading: What It Is, What It Isn’t, What It Could Be (Grades 2-12)

    Vicki Vinton, Author & Consultant, Literacy Consultant, NY
    Too often close reading is envisioned as a teacher-driven procedure where students are required to read a text multiple times and answer text-dependent questions. In this interactive workshop, however, Vicki Vinton will share a more authentic, meaningful and student-centered process that invites students to develop their own supportable interpretations and analyses with a minimum of teacher scaffolding. You’ll learn how to plan and facilitate close reading sessions by developing a repertoire of dynamic teaching moves and practices that can help you ‘steer the ship’ of student thinking, and you’ll deepen your own understanding and vision of what it means to read closely and think deeply.

    Reading Recovery Pre-Conference Workshops | 11:00 am–4:00 pm

    PC-5 — Featured
    Lessons Too Long Something’s Gone Wrong

    Sue Duncan, Trainer, Georgia State University, GA
    We will explore the history of why we have a 30-minute lesson and examine some of the reasons that lessons might get too long.

    PC-6 — Featured
    Between the Covers: An Exploration of the Gifts that Stories Offer

    Dr. Allyson Matczuk, Reading Recovery Trainer, Canadian Institute of Reading Recovery Western Region
    The little story books children read in Reading Recovery lessons are rich in opportunities to use features of prints to facilitate the use of all sources of information. We will explore the many unexpected “gifts” offered to readers and consider the ways in which they may facilitate literacy processing for individuals.

Monday, October 29, 2018

  • Session A | 8:30 am–10:00 am

    Keynote Session
    Voice and Choice: Fostering Student Ownership (Grades K-8)

    Donalyn Miller, Author, Book Whisperer, Inc., TX
    While students are learning the skills of reading, they must also develop a positive reading identity to remain readers. By negotiating both academic and personal reading goals, empowering students’ reading choices, and providing opportunities for students to share and promote their responses to what they read, we can increase young readers’ engagement and effort. In this session, Donalyn Miller shares classroom examples, relevant research, instructional moves, and strategies for supporting young readers as they grow into lifelong readers.

  • Session B | 10:30 am–12:00 pm

    LCB-1 — Featured
    Lifting the Chill from the Writing Classroom (Grades K-8)

    Ralph Fletcher, Author, NH
    In recent years the writing classroom has become more constricted for young writers. There’s less choice. Academic genres proliferate. This workshop will look at why this happened, and how we can re-energize the writing workshop so it becomes a place where kids can experience pleasure and find their stride as writers. Ralph Fletcher is author of The Writing Teacher’s Companion: Embracing Choice, Voice, Purpose & Play.

    LCB-2 — Featured
    Teaching Reading Mini-Lessons: All Roads Lead to Joyful Independent Reading (Grades K-6)

    Irene Fountas, Author/Director, Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA
    Gay Su Pinnell, Author, Professor Emerita, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

    Short, explicit reading mini-lessons support each student’s independent reading life in the classroom. Learn how to identify reading, writing, and language goals from The Literacy Continuum to identify texts sets, plan for a sequence of mini-lessons, use an inquiry-based mini-lesson structure, link reading mini-lessons to other instructional contexts, and help students write about reading in a reader’s notebook.

    Required Text: The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum (2016, Heinemann)

    LCB-3 — Featured
    Building Literacy Classrooms of Joyful Growth (Grades K-6)

    Christine Hertz, Educational Consultant, Heinemann, VT
    Author and educator, Christine Hertz will empower literacy teachers to reclaim the most important aspects of education: creating joyful, independent, motivated, engaged, and resourceful students. Christine will outline the research and studies that support the claim that social-emotional growth, play, and interpersonal skills are essential and critical aspects of successful classrooms. Additionally, teachers will learn and practice strategies that build resilience, flexibility, optimism, and empathy in their students; and have opportunities to see how this work enhances the literacy instruction already in place and folds seamlessly into an already cram-packed school day. This strand will focus heavily on the practical day to day choices a teacher can make to build her literacy classroom into one of joyful, independent growth.

    LCB-4 — Featured
    Supporting English Learners in the Reading Workshop (Grades K-2)

    Lindsey Moses, Associate Professor, Author, Arizona State University, AZ
    This session is focused on supporting English learners in the Reading Workshop. Teachers will be presented with differentiated instructional strategies for supporting learners at all language proficiency levels throughout all stages of the Reading Workshop: planning units of study, whole-group instruction, guided learning experiences, small-group instruction, and reflection and sharing. The instructional strategies and suggestions will include informational and fiction units of study with classroom teaching and differentiation examples, suggested children's literature, and student examples.

    LCB-5 — Featured
    “We Don’t Write About Anything”: Helping Middle Schoolers Love Literacy (Grades K-8)

    Carol Ann Tomlinson, William Clay Parrish, Jr. Professor, University of Virginia, VA
    It’s much more likely that young adolescents will invest their effort in developing the skills of literacy when they see it as an extension of themselves rather than a series of mechanical exercises. This session will focus on instructional principles and practices that appeal to middle schoolers while calling on reading, writing, speaking, and other key facets of literacy. Examples are classroom tested and enliven both teaching and learning.

    LCB-6
    Creating Coaching Conditions that Integrate Literacy Instruction and Social-Emotional Learning (Grades PreK-8)

    Gina Fugnitto, Director of Consultant Development, Center for the Collaborative Classroom, FL 
    Examine the role of literacy coach and the impact on instructional practices that help students lead literate lives. Explore the impact on literacy instruction through the integration of social-emotional competencies. 

    LCB-7 
    The Art of Comprehension: Engaging Meaning-Making and Writing Craft (Grades 3-6)

    Trevor Bryan, Art/Literacy Teacher, Jackson School District, FL
    This interactive presentation will introduce attendees to The Art of Comprehension (AoC), a teacher and student friendly approach that uses artworks and illustrations to meaningfully engage all students in comprehension and writing strategies. Because visual texts are highly accessible to all students, this approach is especially well-suited for helping striving learners. Attendees will also explore how AoC can be utilized when working with various written texts. 

    LCB-8 
    Teacher as Decision-Maker in Guided Reading (Grades K-2)

    Robin Griffith, Associate Professor, Literacy, Texas Christian University, TX
    Good literacy instruction requires responsive teaching. Guided reading, in particular, demands thoughtful teaching decisions - planned and in-the-moment. Videos and in-session activities will illustrate a framework for teacher decision making in guided reading.

    LCB-9 
    Collaborative Learning in Action - Peer Learning Labs (Grades PreK-8)

    Audrey Goninan, Reading Coach, Fort Mill School District, SC
    Matthew Johnson, Principal, Fort Mill School District, SC
    In this session, instructional coaches and school leaders will be introduced to how Peer Learning Labs can serve as powerful, professional learning opportunities for their teachers. You'll discover methods for preparing a successful lab, identify the structure of a Peer Learning Lab, see examples of a lab in action, discuss tools that promote reflection and hear how Peer Learning Labs have impacted teacher and student growth. 

    LCB-10
    Sharing the Pen with Our Youngest Writers (Grades K-2)

    Launa Kruithof, Literacy Consultant K-5, Valley Central School District, NY
    Amy Wendel, Literacy Consultant K-5, Valley Central School District, NY
    How do we get our youngest students to understand the fundamentals of writing? This session will focus on the components of interactive writing and how it fosters independence through the use of authentic and responsive teaching. 

    LCB-11
    Fitting it All In! Integration through STEAM and PBL (Grades PreK-K)

    Rashmi Pimprekar, Program Director, STEAM and Computer Science,  Lesley University, MA
    Kreg Hanning, Director of Technology and Innovation, Lesley University, MA
    Jacy Edelman, Assistant Director, Lesley STEAM Learning Lab, Lesley University, MA

    In this session we will explore how to integrate reading, writing, computational thinking, and phonics instruction into a STEAM + CS projects. Meet the ISTE computational thinking integration guidelines, along with next-generation science, math and literacy standards. Come learn how to align both standards-based learning with a project-based learning approach. 

    LCB-12
    Moving Shared and Performance Reading Forward in the Intermediate Grades (Grades 3-6)

    Robin McMillan, Literacy Consultant, Valley Central School District, NY
    Linda Weiner, Literacy Consultant, Valley Central School District, NY

    This session will highlight the benefits and values of using shared and performance reading with intermediate/middle-level readers. We will discuss how the use of shared reading can strengthen word analysis, vocabulary, fluency, text structures, and craft within fiction and nonfiction texts. We will learn how to be innovative with texts to produce scripts and personal versions for performance reading.

    LCB-13
    Multi-tiered Systems of Support (MTSS) and Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI) Supporting Students in Reading and Writing (Grades K-2)

    Christina Mead, Reading Specialist/EST Coordinator, Essex Westford School District, VT
    June Golato, SLP, Kindergarten Literacy Support, Essex Westford School District, VT

    Essex Elementary School has been using Multi-tiered System of Supports to help students who struggle academically and behaviorally. Through MTSS, children are provided with quality first instruction and classroom differentiation, and if needed, additional supports beyond the classroom. In this session, you will learn about our MTSS process which includes: teacher collaboration through PLC’s, team strategy plans, Educational Support Team plans, and how LLI fits into supporting students that struggle with reading and writing.

    LCB-14
    Living Mentors: Picture Books Creators Lesa Cline-Ransome & James Ransome (Grades 3-6)  

    Susannah Richards, Associate Professor, Education, Eastern Connecticut State University, CT 
    Lesa Cline-Ransome, Author, CT
    James Ransome, Illustrator, CT

    This session will be an opportunity to learn the research, writing and illustration process from two highly acclaimed picture book creators. The focus will showcase how published writers and illustrators move through the writing process from initial idea to a published book. This will serve as a model for creating and implementing authentic curriculum that includes interactive read alouds, literature discussion, writing about reading, research and expository writing. 

    LCB-15
    The Cycle of Conferring Intentions: Bringing Joy and Agency to the Forefront of Your Reading Conference (Grades 3-6)
    Jennifer Scoggin, Ed.D, Director, LitLife, CT
    Hannah Schneewind, Lead Consultant, LitLife, CT

    This session will encourage you to reconsider the vital work of conferring, emphasizing the critical need to engage students more fully in their reading lives. Building on current research related to student motivation, student engagement, best instructional practices and effective feedback, the presenters will share a new framework for conferring the Cycle of Conferring Intentions (CCI). You will engage with the framework through videos and transcripts and leave with a tool kit of resources. 

    LCB-16
    Establishing a Highly-Effective Literacy Team in Order to Influence School Culture and Instruction (Grades PreK-8)  

    Alesa Smith, Primary Literacy Coach, Dalton Public Schools, GA
    Lauren Belonzi, Intermediate Literacy Coach, Dalton Public Schools, GA
    Jason Brock, Principal, Dalton Public Schools, GA

    This session is designed for literacy coaches and school administrators who want to learn about establishing effective literacy teams. You will hear the story of one school's journey to build school culture and literacy expertise through a school-based literacy team. Protocols, artifacts, and data will be shared. 

    LCB-17
    School Culture – A Guide to Thrive! (Grades PreK-8)  

    Derek Thompson, Principal, Henry B. Burkland Elementary School, MA
    Defining the end goal and getting there are two different things. Most school leaders and coaches have a good idea of where they want their schools to be in the end but getting there can be frustrating and elusive. In this session, you'll learn how to meet your goals and develop a skill set to navigate the many roadblocks and obstacles that can get in the way of bringing your school to the next level.

    LCB-18
    Before Reading and Writing - There Was Oral Language (Grades PreK-K)  

    Vincent Ventura, Director, LitLife International, MX
    Do you believe that oral language is the foundation of literacy and supports reading and writing? If so, join us! Explore best practices of developing oral language skills in early childhood classrooms. Develop a deeper understanding on the shift of using precise and targeted teacher talk with explicit and extended student talk. Discover a repertoire of practical oral language strategies and understand its connection to reading, writing and vocabulary acquisition. 

  • Reading Recovery Session B | 10:30 am–12:00 pm

    RRB-1 — Featured
    Time is of the Essence

    Elizabeth Kaye, Assistant Professor and Reading Recovery Trainer, Texas Woman's University, TX
    The Reading Recovery lesson framework calls for children to be highly engaged with reading and writing in expertly designed and delivered 30-minute lessons. Do you find your lessons running long? This session will cover five key concepts that are critical to ensuring that your half-hour with students is powerful and efficient.

    RRB-2 — Featured
    Where the Visible Meets the Invisible

    Dr. Allyson Matczuk, Reading Recovery Trainer, Canadian Institute of Reading Recovery Western Region
    The sources of information in text are available to readers, but much more information is available to the individual from their personal repertoire of experiences and knowledge. The information in text and a reader’s overt behaviors are visible to teachers, but the unique perspectives of the reader are invisible. This session is designed to help teachers shift perspective on “the known” from letters and words to something much bigger.

    RRB-3 
    “That Would Make an Interesting Story!” - Scaffolding the Art of Composing

    Laurel Dickey, Author, Staff/Faculty, Collaborative for Educational Services, MA
    Students write stories every day during their Reading Recovery lessons. Learning to compose rich and meaningful stories full of opportunities to learn about writing is critical in terms of supporting accelerated literacy progress. During this session we will explore how teachers can support powerful story-composing by students. 

  • Session C | 1:30 pm–3:00 pm

    LCC-1 — Featured
    Essentials of the Writing Workshop (Grades K-8)

    Ralph Fletcher, Author, NH
    What are ideal conditions to grow strong writers? What are our core beliefs about teaching writing? This session will explore basic elements of the writing classroom with an emphasis on how mentor texts can lift the quality of student writing. Ralph Fletcher is author of The Writing Teacher’s Companion: Embracing Choice, Voice, Purpose & Play.

    LCC-2 — Featured
    Building Literacy Classrooms of Joyful Growth (Repeat) (Grades K-6)

    Christine Hertz, Educational Consultant, Heinemann, VT
    Author and educator, Christine Hertz will empower literacy teachers to reclaim the most important aspects of education: Creating joyful, independent, motivated, engaged, and resourceful students. Christine will outline the research and studies that support the claim that social-emotional growth, play, and interpersonal skills are essential and critical aspects of successful classrooms. Additionally, teachers will learn and practice strategies that build resilience, flexibility, optimism, and empathy in their students, and have opportunities to see how this work enhances the literacy instruction already in place and folds seamlessly into an already cram-packed school day. This strand will focus heavily on the practical day to day choices a teacher can make to build her literacy classroom into one of joyful, independent growth.

    LCC-3 — Featured
    Books for A Better World 2017–2018 (Grades K-8)

    Donalyn Miller, Author, Book Whisperer, Inc., TX
    Reading offers validation for our experiences and fosters empathy and awareness of others who have different perspectives than ours. In this session, Donalyn Miller shares 40 current books that offer diverse reading experience for your students and provides resources and suggestions for using these books in the classroom and home.

    LCC-4 — Featured
    Supporting English Learners in the Reading Workshop (Repeat) (Grades K–2)

    Lindsey Moses, Associate Professor, Author, Arizona State University, AZ
    This session is focused on supporting English learners in the Reading Workshop. Teachers will be presented with differentiated instructional strategies for supporting learners at all language proficiency levels throughout all stages of the Reading Workshop: planning units of study, whole-group instruction, guided learning experiences, small-group instruction, and reflection and sharing. The instructional strategies and suggestions will include informational and fiction units of study with classroom teaching and differentiation examples, suggested children's literature, and student examples.

    LCC-5 — Featured
    Ten Guidelines for Differentiating Reading and Writing (Grades K-8)

    Carol Ann Tomlinson, William Clay Parrish, Jr. Professor, University of Virginia, VA
    A hallmark of today’s classrooms is student diversity, and that diversity is perhaps never more evident than in the spread of reading and writing proficiency in any grade level. Helping each student grow from his or her current level of proficiency in literacy calls on teachers to provide multiple pathways to vigorous growth for students whose entry points differ widely. In this session, we’ll take a look at ten guidelines for effectively differentiating literacy development and illustrate the guidelines with classroom examples.

    LCC-6 — Featured
    Letting Students Be the Protagonists in Their Own Learning: Bringing Inquiry into the ELA Classroom (Grades 2-12)

    Vicki Vinton, Author & Consultant, Literacy Consultant, NY
    The great educator Jerome Bruner once wrote, “Being able to ‘go beyond the information’ given to ‘figure things out’ is one of the few untarnishable joys of life.” And in this interactive session, you’ll learn how to set students up to ‘figure things out’ by designing both small and larger inquiries into aspects of reading and writing that position students to be the protagonists in their own learning. Additionally, you’ll learn how to support those inquiries by offering the kind of in-the-moment feedback that John Hattie calls, “Just in time, just for me, just where I am in the learning process."

    LCC-7 — Featured
    Connecting Educators and Families: Engaging Literacy Strategies and Activities (Grades K-6)

    Marcie Aboff, Children’s Author, Literacy Advocate, NJ
    Marcie believes literacy development is a team effort between teachers and parents. She’ll share a variety of ways educators can engage families to boost children’s literacy skills. Many tips and activities are easily integrated throughout a family’s busy day, and several activities can also be used in the classroom. The busiest of parents, as well as ELL parents, will discover practical, easy, and fun ways to foster literacy development. 

    LCC-8 — Featured
    Harnessing Tech-Infused Collaboration to Empower Literacy Coaches (Grades 3-6)

    Stephanie Affinito, Faculty, University at Albany, NY
    Krista Senatore, Literacy Coach, Schuylerville Central Schools, NY
    Shelley Fenton, Literacy Coach, South Glens Falls School District, NY

    When you lead the learning of others, tending to your own learning can be challenging. By harnessing the power of tech-infused collaboration, literacy coaches can empower their own learning and strengthen their literacy coaching for teachers. In this session, you'll learn how to use tech-infused collaboration to connect with other literacy coaches, imagine new ideas and possibilities for yourself and your teachers, and personalize your own learning.

    Required Materials: A mobile device.     

    LCC-9
    Quickwrites: Pump Up the Volume for Purposeful Writing Each Day (Grades 3-6)

    Paula Bourque, Literacy Coach, Author, Augusta Schools/Stenhouse Publishers, ME
    What could 5-10 extra minutes of writing a day do for your students? You'd be amazed. Join me to see how daily quickwrites can foster deeper thinking, activate schema, build self-awareness, increase metacognition, decrease writer's block, stimulate creativity, and cultivate more joy with writing while providing teachers with an insight into student understanding and learning. Low stakes can mean high returns with daily and purposeful fun bursts of writing.

    LCC-10
    How to Accelerate Literacy & Learning with Screen Smart Skills (Grades PreK-3)

    Nicole Dreiske, Executive Director, International Children's Media Center, IL
    Literacy expert and author, Nicole Dreiske will show you how to boost literacy using her revolutionary Screen SmartTM approach. This neuroscience-based method uses field-tested pedagogies from forty years of research with multi-sensory techniques. You’ll learn how “connecting the stories on screens to the stories in books” can strengthen comprehension, retention, empathy, vocabulary and higher order thinking for children in Prek-3rd grade. 

    LCC-11
    Developing Teachers' Critical Literacies and Instructional Practices (Grades K-2)

    Sara Kugler, Educational Specialist, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA
    Raven Compton, Literacy Collaborative Coach, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA
    Grace Choi, Kindergarten teacher, Literacy Coach, Fairfax County Public Schools,VA

    Our goal as teachers is to foster readers who will be active and critical agents in their consumption of text and the world around them. In this session, you'll bridge the gap between critical literacy theory and classroom instruction by critically analyzing classroom practices and a variety of texts. You'll also engage in techniques that can be replicated in PLC meetings to deepen teacher understandings and design instruction within a critical literacy framework. 

    LCC-12
    A Three Scoop Content Rich Cone: Fluency, Prosody, Comprehension (Grades 3-6)

    Nancy Legath, Literacy Specialist and Coach, Downingtown Area School District, PA
    Elizabeth H. Madarang, Literacy Specialist and Coach, Downingtown Area School District, PA

    Using content rich texts, we build fluency, grow prosody, and foster comprehension. These literacy skills are developed through content related poetry and reader's theaters in this session. Learning how to transform an informational text to a customized reader's theater, seeking content related online fluency tools, and mixing up how to model reading are shared. Current research supporting these fluency teaching techniques is integrated throughout the presentation. 

    LCC-13
    Organizing the Learning Environment to Provide Rich Opportunities (Grades K-2)

    Kristine Pelletier, District Literacy Implementation Specialist, K-5, Manchester Public Schools, NH
    Colleen Anderson, Kindergarten teacher, Henry Wilson School, NH

    Research on the classroom environment has shown that the physical arrangement can affect the behavior of both students and teachers and that a well-structured classroom tends to improve student academic and behavioral outcomes. This presentation will feature a primary teacher’s journey in transforming her classroom into a space that empowers students to manage their learning independently. Video footage featuring management lessons that gradually release the responsibility to the students will be shared.

    LCC-14
    International Literature Provides a Gateway for Collaborative Learning (Grades 5-8)

    Tina Proulx, Teacher, Manchester School District, NH
    Anne McQuade, Teacher, Manchester School District, NH

    Culturally responsive teaching is a necessary component to realize equity literacy in our schools today. Teachers are responsible for their students’ acclimation to school but can find this problematic as they are unaware of the cultural mores of their diverse students. Literature, highlighting the experiences of immigrant groups and incorporated into the larger curriculum, may be their most practical and least combative introduction to issues of immigration. It can also allow for discussions across peers that may help bridge the social connections necessary to learn. Creating space for discussions about immigrant experiences in the children’s literature class is a positive step in the right direction. This workshop begins a dialogue for educators to create safe spaces for our immigrant and refugee students to access an equitable education. Reading, writing, and discussion through international text helps expose and nurture funds of knowledge necessary to help these students be successful.

    LCC-15
    Expanding Literacy with QR Codes & Augmented Reality (Grades K-8)

    Jacy Edelman, Assistant Director, Lesley STEAM Learning Lab, MA
    Kreg Hanning, Director, Technology and Innovation, Lesley STEAM Learning Lab, MA
    Rashmi Pimprekar, Program Director, STEAM and Computer Science,  Lesley University, MA

    Have you been curious about connecting QR codes and augmented reality (AR) to literature but not sure where to begin? This session will offer a hands-on introduction to building QR codes and AR experiences that allow students to access interactive content in a variety of mediums. For younger students, QR codes can offer direct links to peer work, support literacy circles with videos of author readings, or add an audio layer to a word wall. Older students can bring their personal narratives to life, illustrate poetry with visual or audio assets, or create their own AR scavenger hunts. Join us and experience literature in a new dimension.
     
    Required materials: Bring your IPad or tablet if you have one. If you do not, tech will be provided. 

    LCC-16
    The Story of Monitoring and Searching in Early Literacy (Grades K-2)

    Robert M. Schwartz, Professor Emeritus, Oakland University, VT
    How to teach word recognition is a contentious issue in literacy education. Word recognition attempts change over time as children increase their knowledge of phonics and orthographic patterns. We’ll consider how to build on students’ strengths as they learn to monitor their attempts and search for additional information. Self-monitoring provides the mechanism for novice readers to refine their word recognition strategies and move toward the fast-perceptual processing that supports skilled readers’ meaning construction. 

    LCC-17
    Teachers Learn by Doing: Lesson Study as Professional Development (Grades PreK-8)

    Heather Wall, Professional Learning Specialist, Hall County Schools, GA
    Lesson study is powerful professional development in which teachers form inquiry groups, discuss problems of practice and then co-create and teach a series of lessons to students. You'll learn about strategies for implementing lesson study as well as facilitation methods that allow for teacher inquiry and empowerment, take part in the beginning stages of a lesson study involving the examination of student work; and discuss potential pitfalls to avoid. 

  • Reading Recovery Session C | 1:30 pm–3:00 pm

    RRC-1 — Featured
    Reading is a Message-Getting Activity: Are We Doing Everything We Can to Ensure That Children Are Using Meaning and Understanding the Text They Are Reading?

    Sue Duncan, Trainer, Georgia State University, GA
    In this session, we will think about how to support children to use meaning while reading and to think about children making meaning and comprehending text as they read. We will look in-depth at book choice and introductions to text reading with Phrasing in Fluent Reading as ways to support children using meaning and understanding what they are reading.

    RRC-2 — Featured
    Time is of the Essence (Repeat)

    Elizabeth Kaye, Assistant Professor and Reading Recovery Trainer, Texas Woman's University, TX
    The Reading Recovery lesson framework calls for children to be highly engaged with reading and writing in expertly designed and delivered 30-minute lessons. Do you find your lessons running long? This session will cover five key concepts that are critical to ensuring that your half-hour with students is powerful and efficient.

    RRC-3 — Featured
    Where the Visible Meets the Invisible (Repeat)

    Dr. Allyson Matczuk, Reading Recovery Trainer, Canadian Institute of Reading Recovery Western Region
    The sources of information in text are available to readers, but much more information is available to the individual from their personal repertoire of experiences and knowledge. The information in text and a reader’s overt behaviors are visible to teachers, but the unique perspectives of the reader are invisible. This session is designed to help teachers shift perspective on “the known” from letters and words to something much bigger.

  • Session C In-Depth | 1:30 pm–4:45 pm

    LCC-18 In-Depth — Featured
    The Neuroscience of Word Study: Igniting the Reading Brain, K-8 (Grades K-8)

    J. Richard Gentry, Author, Researcher, Educational Consultant, AL
    Best practice word study targets and integrates the reading processes established through scientific research as critical to literacy learning. Neuroscience and cognitive psychology are now charting new paths for reading success and revolutionizing our understanding of best practices for word study. This session shows the role word study plays for building the developing reading and writing brain from the beginning phases in kindergarten through elementary school and even provides support for detection of dyslexia and dyslexic-specific interventions. Leave this session with a 21st century view of the importance of word study and evidence-based strategies to take back into the classroom—possibly the missing link to literacy instruction.

  • Session D | 3:30 pm–5:00 pm

    LCD-1 — Featured
    Use Choice to Help Students Self Differentiate their Learning (Grades K-8)

    Mike Anderson, Consultant, Mike Anderson Consulting, NH
    Differentiation (especially when we think of differentiated instruction as opposed to differentiated learning) often feels overwhelming for teachers. In this session, explore how student choice can be a vehicle for students learning how to self-differentiate their learning in literacy. You will learn a framework and process for using choice well with students and gain valuable resources for weaving choice into daily learning in your classroom.

    LCD-2 — Featured
    Modern Classics You Should Be Teaching (Grades 3-6)

    Tracey Baptiste, Author/Faculty, Lesley University, MA
    We all love our old classics, but often older literature contains language and themes that we’ve moved beyond as a modern society. In this session, Tracey Baptiste will explore modern classics that can replace or be taught alongside the literature we have all loved.

    LCD-3 — Featured
    Ba-da-bing! A One Sentence Technique that Can Change Your Students’ Writing (Grades K-8)

    Gretchen Bernabei, Literacy Coach, Advanced Learning Academy/San Antonio Independent School District, TX
    Come learn a specific, concrete classroom practice with dozens of uses. It’s short, easy, powerful, and it works for all students, primary to adult. (For everyone.)

    LCD-4 — Featured
    Jumpstarting Readers When They Plateau: Maximizing Connections Between Shared and Guided Reading (Grades K-6)

    Jan Burkins, Writer & Consultant, Burkins & Yaris, GA
    Kim Yaris, Writer & Consultant, Burkins & Yaris, FL
    Why do readers plateau? In this session, we will examine some of the reasons for these inexplicable pauses on the learning continuum. We present shared reading and guided reading strategies, reimagined to optimize the connections between the two and that engage students in constructing meaning from text without creating teacher dependency. Learn practical solutions to common instructional challenges and begin to see that by better connecting the work across the gradual release, we can help children negotiate increasingly complex text.

    LCD-5 — Featured
    Essentials of the Writing Workshop (Repeat) (Grades K-8)

    Ralph Fletcher, Author, NH
    What are ideal conditions to grow strong writers? What are our core beliefs about teaching writing? This session will explore basic elements of the writing classroom with an emphasis on how mentor texts can lift the quality of student writing. Ralph Fletcher is author of The Writing Teacher’s Companion: Embracing Choice, Voice, Purpose & Play.

    LCD-6 — Featured
    Teaching is Heart Work: Cultivating Your Teaching Mindset (Grades K-6)

    Christine Hertz, Educational Consultant, Heinemann, VT
    Teaching—real, from the heart, cutting edge, responsive teaching—is challenging, difficult work. But challenge and difficulty are the companions of words like joyful, rewarding, and meaningful. Teaching is for the dedicated, the passionate, the hopeful, and the innovative. In this session, author and educator, Christine Hertz will help ground literacy professionals in the art and the heart of teaching. Christine will guide educators in looking at the research and the reasons behind cultivating teaching mindsets and will offer practical strategies for becoming our most flourishing, empathetic, playful, flexible and reflective selves. We will examine how, by tapping into these five teaching mindsets, we can be the teachers our children deserve.

    LCD-7 — Featured
    Access to Books: Game Changer for Kids (Grades K-8)

    Donalyn Miller, Author, Book Whisperer Inc., TX
    Children with meaningful access to books achieve at higher levels and experience greater engagement with reading. In this session, examine the current research on book access in schools, libraries, and homes; discuss intellectual and cultural access concerns like diversity and leveling; and explore resources and strategies for developing and sustaining high-quality classroom library collections that support students’ reading lives.

    LCD-8
    Ignite Your Teaching by Being a Teacher-Writer (Grades K-5)

    Stacey Shubitz, Literacy Specialist and Author, Balanced Literacy Consulting, PA
    Teachers of writing know the most powerful thing they can do is to be a writer themselves since it allows them to sit writer-to-writer with a student when they confer. Attendees will engage in some creative writing in their writer’s notebooks. There will be an opportunity to share within partnerships and with the whole group. You'll leave this session with writing pieces they can develop and share with their students.

    LCD-9
    Ten Guidelines for Differentiating Reading and Writing (Repeat) (Grades K-8)

    Carol Ann Tomlinson, William Clay Parrish, Jr., Professor, University of Virginia, GA
    A hallmark of today’s classrooms is student diversity, and that diversity is perhaps never more evident than in the spread of reading and writing proficiency in any grade level. Helping each student grow from his or her current level of proficiency in literacy calls on teachers to provide multiple pathways to vigorous growth for students whose entry points differ widely. In this session, we’ll take a look at ten guidelines for effectively differentiating literacy development and illustrate the guidelines with classroom examples.

    LCD-10
    Stranger than Fiction: Helping Students Deeply Understand Ideas and Facts in Nonfiction (Grades 3-8)

    Vicki Vinton, Author & Consultant, Literacy Consultant, NY
    Albert Einstein reputedly said, “Any fool can know. The point is to understand.” In this interactive session, we’ll explore the difference between knowing and understanding as we dig into how to design nonfiction reading instruction that aims for deep understanding. To do that, we’ll look at the importance of welcoming confusion into our rooms with some new ways of thinking about inferring and main ideas, and how to use talk to construct versus demonstrate understanding in ways that will forge students’ reasoning skills. And along the way, we’ll look at the need not just to be planned but prepared so that we can be responsive in the moment.

    LCD-11
    21st Century Reading Engagement: Books and Tech say, “I do!” (Grades 3-6)

    Christy Callahan, Reading Specialist, Dale Street School, MA
    Jennifer Bassett, Reading Specialist, Dale Street School, MA

    Looking for new ways to engage and motivate your readers?  We have just the thing!  We will share various apps and sites that teachers can utilize before, during, and after reading.  Leave with an easy-to-use technology toolbox of ideas to engage your students tomorrow.  We will explore Bookopolis, Padlet, Voicethread and Chatter Pix Kids, as well as other innovative tools.
     
    Required materials: Attendees will need to have an electronic device as our presentation is interactive. 

    LCD-12
    Commitment as a Collaborative Team: Coaching, Opportunities for Structured Professional Learning, and Communication with ALL! (Grades K-2)

    Shannon Carlson, Literacy Collaborative Literacy Coach, Dennis-Yarmouth Regional School District, MA
    Giordana Cote, Dean of Students, Dennis-Yarmouth Regional School District, MA

    How can we establish collaborative efforts to empower our students and develop a team of educators who share a sense of agency and commitment while honoring their past experiences and work? By sharing coaching sessions, opportunities for professional growth, and increasing communication, we are developing effective forms for professional learning. This has a significant impact on student learning and provides opportunities for Literacy Collaborative Literacy Coaches and District Instructional Coaches to learn alongside our colleagues while implementing change, encouraging shared responsibility, and fostering opportunities for curriculum discourse. In this session, we will offer how implementing the Literacy Collaborative instructional framework in conjunction with the demands of district curriculum has provided opportunities for further growth and refined understandings of what it means to meet the needs of our readers and writers. 

    LCD-13
    Bull's Eye! Hitting the Target for Every Student (Grades K-2)

    Dianne Connolly, Principal, Haverhill Public Schools, MA
    Joanie Gorman, Literacy Coach, Haverhill Public Schools, MA
    Sara Hastings, Reading Recovery Teacher/Interventionist, Haverhill Public Schools, MA
    Michelle Coulouras, Grade One Teacher, Haverhill Public Schools, MA

    Hitting the reading target for every student requires precision, skill and practice. Learn how a dedicated Professional Learning Community of teachers, support staff, administration, and specialists created a targeted Tiered Reading System for all students: Shared mission – shared responsibility – shared success. Pentucket Lake Elementary School was recognized for their extensive turnaround work. The Smarter Learning Group from Hobbs, New Mexico chose Pentucket Lake’s Literacy approach to emulate in their district after hearing about the intense collaboration and literacy work done at Pentucket Lake and sending a school team to visit. You'll leave this session with the tools, videos and training to implement this targeted instruction. 

    LCD-14
    Moving Forward with Guided Word Study (Grades K-2)

    Michele Dufresne, Author, Literacy Consultant, Private Consultant, MA
    Strengthen your students’ word study skills during guided reading by including developmentally appropriate word study activities that strengthen phonemic awareness, phonics, and spelling. Learn how to use student assessments to select short, engaging activities that connect reading and writing. Presentation includes video clips of guided word study activities with emergent, early and transitional readers. 

    LCD-15
    The Princess & the Dragon: Using Center Time to Strengthen Literacy Skills for All Learners (Grades PreK-K)
    Lori A. Dunn, Special Educator, Reading Specialist, Doctoral Student, Boston College, RI
    Carol Cipollini, Reading Specialist, Early Childhood Special Educator, East Providence School District, RI

    Children are rushing to every corner of the classroom, eager to engage in their favorite activities. It must be time for centers where children learn wonderful lessons of sharing and turn-taking, essential to social skills development. Consider a center time that gives young children, especially those with special needs, opportunities to expand their literacy skills by encouraging conversation and creative thinking. Explore typical center time and discover ways to make yours anything but typical! 

    LCD-16
    Find Your Voice, Pursue Positivity (Grades 3-6) 

    Jillian Fountain, Intermediate/Middle School Faculty Trainer, Lesley University Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, MA 
    A strong, collaborative school culture is essential to both teacher and student growth. While culture lies within a complex system, every faculty member plays a role in fostering a collaborative environment focused on teacher learning. Teachers, come to discover components of strong school cultures, and develop practical ways to strengthen yours. Feel empowered to take small steps that will make a difference in your school’s professional atmosphere starting right now. 

    LCD-17
    Coaching: Nurturing Relationships within Data-Driven Conversations (Grades PreK-8)

    Debra Lewis Hogate, MPCL Trainer, University of Maine, ME
    In this presentation, we will explore the role of relationships within coaching with an emphasis on student data and coaching cycles. We will also discuss how coaching conversations can facilitate strong teacher decision making to promote optimal student literacy learning. 

  • Reading Recovery Session D | 3:30 pm–5:00 pm

    RRD-1 — Featured
    Reading is a Message-Getting Activity: Are We Doing Everything We Can to Ensure That Children are Using Meaning and Understanding the Text They are Reading? (Repeat)

    Sue Duncan, Trainer, Georgia State University, GA
    In this session, we will think about how to support children to use meaning while reading, and to think about children making meaning and comprehending text as they read. We will look in-depth at book choice and introductions to text reading with Phrasing in Fluent Reading as a way to support children using meaning and to understand what they are reading.

    RRD-2 — Featured
    Promoting Powerful Processing: Teaching for Strategic Activity Across the Lesson

    Mary Rosser, Director, UTC for Reading Recovery and Comprehensive Literacy, University of Maine, ME
    Clay contends that, “Learners need to be able to read and write texts relatively independently in ways that could lead to the learner taking on new competencies through his or her own efforts in the classroom [...] The aim is to enable eight-year-old readers to develop a strategic base for the complex literacy processing with which they will need to engage as ten, twelve, or sixteen-year-old readers." This session explores the Reading Recovery lesson framework with particular attention to how each component provides teachers with an opportunity to teach for strategic activity that promotes powerful processing across the lesson.

    RRD-3
    Getting Around the Major Roadblocks: Tentativeness, Flexibility and Problem Solving in the Lesson Series

    Virginia Harford, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader/Literacy Specialist, Guilderland School District, NY
    Kathy State, Reading Recovery Teacher and Language Arts Coordinator, Guilderland School District, NY
    Lois McDonald, Reading Recovery, Literacy Specialist, Guilderland School District, NY

    Do you struggle with ‘designing your lessons to suit the individual learner,’ while keeping true to all of the components of the daily 30-minute lesson? Clay tells us that tentativeness and flexibility are the bywords of RR instruction. This session will explore solutions to behaviors that block learning and consume precious lesson time. From some of the challenges that the English language learner faces, to the student with the wandering eye, to the child whose uncooperative behaviors keep sending you back to the drawing board, we will help you think outside the structured daily lesson record box with some practical ideas for hard-to-reach children without straying too far from center.

Tuesday, October 30, 2018

  • Session E | 8:30 am–10:00 am

    Keynote Reading
    A Personal Art
    (Grades K-8)
    Nancie Atwell, Author and Educator, Scholastic, ME
    In her keynote speech, Nancie Atwell will focus on independent book reading and the enormous benefits to student readers—in accuracy, stamina, vocabulary, the development of reading habits, and a passion for literature—when they choose their own books in classrooms with rich libraries and methods that support engagement and growth.

  • Reading Recovery Session E | 8:30 am–10:00 am

    RRE-1 — Featured
    Promoting Powerful Processing: Teaching for Strategic Activity Across the Lesson (Repeat)

    Mary Rosser, Director, UTC For Reading Recovery and Comprehensive Literacy, University of Maine, ME
    Clay contends that, “Learners need to be able to read and write texts relatively independently in ways that could lead to the learner taking on new competencies through his or her own efforts in the classroom [...] The aim is to enable eight-year-old readers to develop a strategic base for the complex literacy processing with which they will need to engage as ten, twelve or sixteen-year-old readers.“ This session explores the Reading Recovery lesson framework with particular attention to how each component provides teachers with an opportunity to teach for strategic activity that promotes powerful processing across the lesson.

    RRE-2 — Featured
    Know When to Hold’em: The Power of Deliberate Pause

    Lori Taylor, Reading Recovery Trainer, University of Maine, ME
    Everything we say or don’t say—everything we do or don’t do—matters. Clay reminds us in Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals that to teach for accelerated learning, the teacher must “make highly skilled decisions moment by moment” using the “clearest, easiest, most memorable examples." We also know, both from the text and from experience, that teacher talk or moves can interfere and confuse. In this session, you'll explore the power of intentionally holding back, holding out, or pausing our response to provide the opportunity for the child to take action in processing print.

    RRE-3
    Making Roaming Around the Known Count from Lessons 1-10

    Joseph Kasick, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Copper Hill Elementary, NJ
    In this session, we will discuss Clay’s theory of reading as it relates to the first ten lessons in a child’s time in Reading Recovery. Through videos and discussions, we will explore these crucial first ten lessons and examine our practices to see if we are laying the foundations for a processing system from lesson 1 that build on the known. 

    RRE-4
    Time for the Whiteboard: Supporting Discoveries in How Words Work

    Katrena Leininger, Reading Recovery Teacher/Literacy Coach/Staff Developer, Denton Independent School District, TX
    Becky Voight, Reading Recovery Teacher/Literacy Coach/Staff Developer, Denton Independent School District, TX

    This interactive session will explore the purpose of different word work procedures and how working with words in isolation helps children discover ways to solve words in texts. You'll read from Literacy Lessons, Designed for Individuals by Marie Clay. We'll use video examples in the session.

  • Session F | 10:30 am–12:00 pm

    LCF-1 — Featured
    Teach Social and Emotional Skills through Reading and Writing
    Workshop (Grades K-8)
    Mike Anderson, Consultant, Mike Anderson Consulting, NH
    Students need a wide array of social and emotional skills to participate effectively in a reading or writing workshop. They need self-awareness to accurately assess their own writing and choose just-right books. They need self-regulation to persist through tough challenges and build stamina as readers and writers. Skills of social awareness and relationship building are critical for students to engage in meaningful conferences. In this session, you will explore these and many other social and emotional skills that students need to be successful, many of which are already embedded in literacy standards. You will also learn several practical strategies for teaching students these critical skills.

    LCF-2 — Featured
    Writing Conferences: Finding and Solving Problems (Grades K-8)

    Nancie Atwell, Author and Educator, Scholastic, ME 
    For more than thirty years, Nancie Atwell helped middle-school students develop a productive writing process, as well as voices as writers and exceptional writing. She will share the guidelines for her conferences with students, the red flags she learned to recognize, and the responses that helped students move their texts towards literature.

    LCF-3 — Featured
    Revision Strategies Your Students Will Actually Enjoy (Grades 3-6)

    Tracey Baptiste, Author/Faculty, Lesley University, MA
    Students don’t like to revise their work, but revision is part of the process of writing, not something separate. In this session, Tracey Baptiste will discuss various revision strategies that she uses and how to get students on board in the revision and rewriting process.

    LCF-4 — Featured
    Kernel Essays, Text Structures, and Drudgery Free Writing (Grades K-8)

    Gretchen Bernabei, Literacy Coach, Advanced Learning Academy/San Antonio Independent School District, TX
    Vygotsky noted that all learning is surrounded by social interactions. Thomas Newkirk says that we keep teaching the five-paragraph essay because we don’t have a teachable alternative. Gretchen Bernabei will share how she translates this thinking into simple, specific, concrete classroom practices for reading and writing, using text structures and surprising mentor texts. This is for all ages, believe it or not.

    LCF-5 — Featured
    Who’s Doing the Work? How to Say Less So Students Can Do More (Grades K-6)

    Jan Burkins, Writer & Consultant, Burkins & Yaris, GA
    Kim Yaris, Writer & Consultant, Burkins & Yaris, FL

    Educators everywhere are frustrated by teaching that isn’t transferring, wondering what they can do differently or better to help students independently apply the strategies they’ve been taught. When such problems arise, the instinct is to do more. However, when we summarize text before reading or guide students when they encounter difficult words, are we leading students to depend on our support? Learn small but powerful adjustments that can be made to instruction that hold students accountable for their own learning and lead them to increased independence and proficiency.

    LCF-6 — Featured
    The Neuroscience of Word Study: Igniting the Reading Brain, Grades K-8 (Repeat)

    J. Richard Gentry, Author, Researcher, Educational Consultant, AL
    Best practice word study targets and integrates the reading processes established through scientific research as critical to literacy learning. Neuroscience and cognitive psychology are now charting new paths for reading success and revolutionizing our understanding of best practices for word study. This session shows the role word study plays for building the developing reading and writing brain from the beginning phases in kindergarten through elementary school and even provides support for detection of dyslexia and dyslexic-specific interventions. Leave this session with a 21st century view of the importance of word study and evidence-based strategies to take back into the classroom—possibly the missing link to literacy instruction.

    LCF-7 — Featured
    Mine Mentor Texts for Powerful Craft Moves (Grades K-6)

    Stacey Shubitz, Literacy Specialist and Author, Balanced Literacy Consulting, PA
    In this session, we will focus on essential craft moves writers make that you can teach your students to make to help them write well. The presenter will share her process for mining picture books to use as mentor texts and will explain how to use mentor text during minilessons, small group strategy lessons, and one-to-one conferences. There will be time to engage in some of your own writing, which will be inspired by a mentor text.

    LCF-8 — Featured
    Stranger than Fiction: Helping Students Deeply Understand Ideas and Facts in Nonfiction (Repeat) (Grades 3-8)

    Vicki Vinton, Author & Consultant, Literacy Consultant, NY
    Albert Einstein reputedly said, “Any fool can know. The point is to understand.” In this interactive session, we’ll explore the difference between knowing and understanding as we dig into how to design nonfiction reading instruction that aims for deep understanding. To do that, we’ll look at the importance of welcoming confusion into our rooms with some new ways of thinking about inferring and main ideas, and how to use talk to construct versus demonstrate understanding in ways that will forge students’ reasoning skills. And along the way, we’ll look at the need not just to be planned but prepared so that we can be responsive in the moment.

    LCF-9 — Featured
    Visual Literacy and the Nonfiction Picture Book (Grades PreK-8)

    Mary Ann Cappiello, Professor, Language & Literacy, Lesley University, MA
    Erika Thulin Dawes, Professor, Language & Literacy, Lesley University, MA

    Recent years have seen a significant increase in the publishing of nonfiction picture books. In this workshop session, we’ll examine the visual images in books in different nonfiction sub-genres such as: biographies, survey books, specialized books, and concept books. Using a visual literacy protocol for nonfiction picture books, we will examine the relationship between the illustrations and the text, noting the different ways in which young readers can access information and emotional context, which leads to deeper understanding.

    LCF-10
    Joyful PD that Sticks: Building and Sustaining Momentum for a School-Wide Literacy Action Plan (Grades PreK-8)

    Katie Cunningham, Associate Professor, Manhattanville College, NY
    Jodi L. Falk, Educational Supervisor, St. Joseph’s School for the Deaf, NY

    As a literacy leader, are you working to create change in your school or district? Are you hopeful about what's working? Are you frustrated by what's not? In this session, you'll learn about a multi-year project to build and sustain momentum for developing a comprehensive literacy action plan focused on balanced literacy and workshop approaches. Come learn about what has worked, how we know, and how to strengthen the impact you are making on teachers and children as literacy learners. 

    LCF-11
    No More Fake Reading: Daily Routines to Motivate and Engage Reluctant Readers (Grades 5-8)

    Berit Gordon, Independent Literacy Consultant and Author, NJ
    This session will provide you with practical, user-friendly ways to motivate reluctant readers without exhausting ourselves in the process. You will receive tried and true resources that engage readers, lift their skill level, and help put students in the driver’s seat of their literacy learning. We will also focus on how to get our students doing more reading on their own, and why doing more matters. At the end, we will look at ways to build a school-wide culture of reading. The goal is for you to leave inspired, refreshed, and reinvigorated to help boost every reader in the room. 

    LCF-12
    Bridging Home and School through Academic Conversations (Grades K-2)

    Sara Hamerla, Assistant Director, ELL Programs, Newton Public Schools, MA
    Nhan Bang, ESL Teacher, Newton Public Schools, MA

    Academic conversations develop listening and speaking skills among students of all ages, including English language learners. Through videos and transcripts of conversations, we'll explore how students improved the quality of interactions during academic conversations at school and at home. You'll consider how to reach out to families to learn about conversation styles of the home. We'll also adapt conversation prompts to make them more culturally proficient for our student populations. 

    LCF-13
    Connecting Literacy and Science Through Talk Strategies in Elementary Classrooms (Grades 3-6)

    Martha Heller-Winokur, Literacy Specialist, Teacher, Consultant, Author, Broadmeadow School, MA
    Jeffrey Winokur, Science Educator, College Faculty, Author, Wheelock College, MA

    This session will focus on the connection between talk strategies used in literacy (such as during an interactive read aloud) and those used in inquiry-based science (as in meaning-making from investigations), and how they are mutually beneficial. We will explore how literacy skills used in whole class science talks can support the development of students' scientific reasoning and conceptual understanding. Particular attention will be paid to the NGSS, science practices and the CCSS.

    LCF-14
    Integrating Digital Literacies for All (Grades PreK-8)

    Dr. Katie Kelly, Professor of Education, Furman University, SC
    Lindsay Yearta, Professor of Education, Winthrop University, SC

    In this session, the presenters will share a variety of digital tools that can be used to create opportunities for enhanced collaboration and communication in the classroom. Authentic integration of technology to enhance literacy teaching and learning will be explored. Examples of the tools being used in elementary classrooms will be shared. 

    Required materials: Please bring devices and join us to discover easy-to-implement digital technologies to add to your teaching toolbox. 

    LCF-15
    Word Wondering: Teaching Vocabulary in Meaningful and Powerful Ways (Grades 3-6)

    Pamela Koutrakos, Educational Consultant, Gravity Goldberg, LLC, NJ
    Three big questions on teachers’ minds are: Which words do I teach? How to I find the time to explicitly address content-specific “domain” words? Which practices are proven to get our learners to transfer word learning to their reading, writing, and speaking? Come discover answers in a session designed to support high-impact vocabulary instruction. You CAN get away from one-size-fits-all approaches and blend playful word collecting with a systematic plan that ensure all children get the language exposure they need. 

    Required texts: Participants should bring 2-4 texts they use with students (read aloud, shared reading, or otherwise). 

    LCF-16
    Connecting Reading and Writing Across the Literacy Block (Grades K-2)

    Meredith Langelier, Literacy Coach, Dennis-Yarmouth Regional School District, MA
    Lisa Kucia, Literacy Coach, Dennis-Yarmouth Regional School District, MA

    Making connections between reading and writing is invaluable for literacy learners. Join us to explore different approaches to take for reading and writing instruction throughout your literacy block. Through videos and student samples, you will explore the power of connection work in reading instruction with work in writing instruction. We will develop ideas to bring to your classrooms. 

    LCF-17
    Leading with Meaning for Deeper Thinking and Discussion (Grades K-2)

    Chrisie Moritz, Literacy Collaborative Coach, Author, Consultant, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA
    Kathleen Fay, Literacy Collaborative Central Trainer, Author, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA
    Suzanne Whaley, Language Arts Coordinator, Author, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA

    Reading is about meaning-making. In guided reading, we help develop this theory of reading in our students by leading with meaning in the book introduction, supporting them with meaning-making as they read, and maintaining an emphasis on meaning through discussion after reading. In this session, we’ll explore ways to plan for book introductions and facilitate discussions that keep meaning at the heart of interactions with texts.

    LCF-18
    Through the Lens: Using Video to Coach for Growth (Grades PreK-8)

    Michelle Palmer, Instructional Coach, Hall County Schools - White Sulphur Elementary, GA
    In this session, the presenter will invite you to explore using video as a means for reflection and growth for teachers. You'll learn about a process that has been effective for both coaches and teachers where teachers video a lesson, share it with the Instructional Coach and receive feedback and coaching. The presenter will take you through the goal setting and feedback process and provide examples of feedback forms, planning forms, etc. so that you can immediately implement when you return to your school.

    LCF-19
    Creating a School Culture and Climate to Improve Literacy for All Students: Lessons Learned from School Improvement (Grades PreK-5/6)

    Carline Pignato, Principal, Boston Public Schools, MA
    Margaret Crosby, Adjunct Faculty, Lesley University, MA

    The history of a school’s change and data that reflects academic improvement over a 4-year span will be defined in order to explore elements that have impacted the principal, teachers, students, and parents. We will examine how the principal, teachers, students, parents and university partners contributed to that change. We will also explore how continuous learning and reflection impact change. This session will be of interest to both administrators and educators. 

    LCF-20
    Poetry Centers in the Intermediate Grades
     (Grades 3-6)
    Seema Sgobbo, Intermediate/Middle School Literacy Trainer, Lesley University Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, MA
    Come explore and discuss the merits of incorporating poetry centers within your classroom. You'll take part in a variety of poetry experiences that integrate reading, writing, talking and listening. This session will help you to make poetry accessible to students in ways that are both meaningful and enjoyable. 

  • Reading Recovery Session F | 10:30 am–12:00 pm

    Reading Recovery Keynote
    Learning How to Look at Print

    Elizabeth Kaye, Assistant Professor and Reading Recovery Trainer, Texas Woman's University, TX
    As children learn to read and write, they continually adjust their visual working systems for literacy. Explore the processing of visual information; from the earliest challenges of learning to look at print to the efficient visual analysis of readers well on the way to developing a self-extending system.

  • Session G | 1:30 pm–3:00 pm

    LCG-1 — Featured
    Teacher Talk: How What We Say (and How We Say It) Impacts How Students Learn (Grades K-8)

    Mike Anderson, Consultant, Mike Anderson Consulting, NH
    Have you ever said to a student, “I love the way you’re working so hard!”? How about, “Here are the three things I’ll be looking for in this next piece of work,”? Or perhaps you’ve said, “If you all work really hard for the next 30 minutes, we’ll do something fun at the end of class!” You probably have—we all have. Even though these statements (among many others) are used with the best of intentions, they might actually lead students to disengage and learn less! In this session, you’ll learn about several common language habits and patterns that many educators find themselves in and have a chance to explore better alternatives. You’ll also learn about a process for changing language habits so that your language better aligns with your best intentions and positive goals for students.

    LCG-2 — Featured
    Modern Classics You Should Be Teaching (Repeat) (Grades 3-6)

    Tracey Baptiste, Author/Faculty, Lesley University, MA
    We all love our old classics, but often older literature contains language and themes that we’ve moved beyond as a modern society. In this session, Tracey Baptiste will explore modern classics that can replace or be taught alongside the literature we have all loved. 

    LCG-3 — Featured
    Ba-da-bing! A One Sentence Technique that Can Change Your Students’ Writing (Repeat) (Grades K-8)

    Gretchen Bernabei, Literacy Coach, Advanced Learning Academy/San Antonio Independent School District, TX
    Come learn a specific, concrete classroom practice with dozens of uses. It’s short, easy, powerful, and it works for all students, primary to adult. (For everyone.)

    LCG-4 — Featured
    Who’s Doing the Work? How to Say Less So Students Can Do More (Repeat) (Grades K-6)

    Jan Burkins, Writer & Consultant, Burkins & Yaris, GA
    Kim Yaris, Writer & Consultant, Burkins & Yaris, FL

    Educators everywhere are frustrated by teaching that isn’t transferring, wondering what they can do differently or better to help students independently apply the strategies they’ve been taught. When such problems arise, the instinct is to do more. However, when we summarize text before reading or guide students when they encounter difficult words, are we leading students to depend on our support? Learn small but powerful adjustments that can be made to instruction that hold students accountable for their own learning and lead them to increased independence and proficiency.

    LCG-5 — Featured
    Ignite Your Teaching by Being a Teacher-Writer (Repeat) (Grades K-5)

    Stacey Shubitz, Literacy Specialist and Author, Balanced Literacy Consulting, PA
    Teachers of writing know the most powerful thing they can do is to be a writer themselves since it allows them to sit writer-to-writer with a student when they confer. Attendees will engage in some creative writing in their writer’s notebooks. There will be an opportunity to share within partnerships and with the whole group. You'll leave this session with writing pieces they can develop and share with their students.
    Required Materials: A Writer's Notebook

    LCG-6 — Featured
    Supporting Emerging Bilingual Students’ Literacy Development Through a Focus on Oracy (Grades 3-6)

    Meg Burns, Assistant Professor, TESOL and Bilingual Education, Lesley University Graduate School of Education, MA
    Do you wonder how to better scaffold your literacy instruction to meet the needs of your English Language Learner students? In this session, we will examine the concept of oracy and its role in literacy development. Concrete strategies will be presented that increase the amount and complexity of student talk in the elementary literacy classroom. We will explore how to connect student talk to writing as your students build toward "Academic English" fluency in grades K-5. 

    LCG-7
    Inquiry-Based Reading Minilessons in the Intermediate Grades (Grades 3-6)

    Kerry Crosby, Adjunct Faculty, Literacy Consultant, Lesley University's Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, MA
    Kristine Haveles-Pelletier, District Literacy Implementation Specialist, K-5, Manchester Public Schools, NH

    Effective minilessons are brief, focused and require students to build their own understandings through inquiry. However, authentic inquiry often takes time. Through video and discussion, we will explore how to allow children the time to discover while keeping our minilessons focused and brief. How do we refine our language and choose mentor text examples that create authentic inquiry opportunities that guide and shift students’ thinking in a short amount of time? This session will focus on Reading Minilessons in Grades 3-5.

    LCG-8
    Whole-School Literacy Improvement: The Partnership Between the Principal and Coach (Grades K-2)

    Kimberly DiFusco, LC Primary District Trainer, Bristol, CT Public Schools, CT
    Dr. David Huber, Principal, South Side School, CT

    This session will explore the partnership between the principal and coach of a Pre-K-5 Title I elementary school building. We will explore how the principal and coach work together to deliver a whole-school literacy improvement model following the Literacy Collaborative Model. 

    LCG-9
    Bringing Meaning to Life and Literacy (Grades K-2)

    Suzanne Fisher, Literacy Collaborative Coach, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA
    Mari Dean, 1st Grade Teacher, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA

    In this session, we'll explore the theory and research behind social-emotional learning and its relationship to academic success. You'll learn how to carefully observe students and reflect on next steps. We'll explore teaching into big ideas such as empathy, perseverance, acceptance, privilege and other topics through components of literacy such as interactive read aloud, shared reading, guided reading and interactive writing.

    LCG-10
    Formative Assessment for Readers: It’s Not So Formidable When You Focus Your Look-Fors (Grades 5-8)

    Gravity Goldberg, Author, Consultant, Gravity Goldberg LLC, NY     
    Renee Houser, Author, Consultant, Growing Educators, CA

    To decide what to teach your readers next, you need a workable method for knowing where they are, right? Workable in that it is a simple, highly practical tool, like a hammer to a carpenter. In this session, we share a way to assess readers that requires only a clipboard, a pen, and look-fors we’ve found transformative in developing avid and astute fiction and nonfiction readers. 

    LCG-11
    Embedding Literacy into Play (Grades PreK-K)

    Colleen Mason, PreK Inclusion Teacher, Boston Public Schools, MA  
    Stephanie Byrd, PreK Inclusion Teacher, Boston Public Schools, MA

    Through the use of purposeful play and inquiry, teachers can both foster creativity and curiosity to support the social-emotional needs of our students and embed academics and skills in a way that maintains joy. 

    LCG-12
    Sticky Minilessons: Getting Students to Learn What We Teach (Grades K-5)

    Leah Mermelstein, Educational Consultant, Author, Read-Write-Connect, INC, NJ
    This workshop will focus on ways to create and develop lessons that engage, inspire and spark student curiosity. Leah will examine the role of talk and conversations in lessons and explore how to use spaced instruction to help kids learn. She will also show you how to use share time as a way to move kids to a deeper understanding of what was taught during the lesson. Leah will bring all of these ideas to life by showing you real live examples from the many classrooms that she visits. 

    LCG-13
    The Power of Digital Storytelling Across the Grades (Grades PreK-8)

    Stephanie Pierce, District Literacy Leader, Teacher, Bennington – Rutland Supervisory Union, VT
    Alison Zylstra, District Literacy Leader, Classroom Teacher, Bennington - Rutland Supervisory Union, VT

    It’s time to move beyond the personal narrative! Digital storytelling is a powerful tool for engaging students in a deep study of the structure and craft of narrative writing. Students have the opportunity to develop content and genre understanding, while discovering the art of precise language paired with impactful visuals. Throughout this session, you will explore the process of creating digital stories with groups of students across grade levels and experience the possibilities of capturing every student’s voice. 

    LCG-14
    Empowering Students Through Choice in the Classroom (Grades 5-8)

    Robin Percival, Literacy Coach, Bristol Public Schools, CT
    This session will help teachers create a classroom where students engage in their own learning, build their ability to self-regulate learning, and develop a sense of educational ownership. 

    LCG-15
    Creative Coaching (Grades PreK-8)

    Lisa Rice, Literacy Consultant K-5, Valley Central School District, NY
    Kristin Parone, Reading Specialist, Valley Central School District, NY

    During this session, Kristin and Lisa will share how they have gotten creative with finding ways to incorporate coaching and professional development in the area of literacy. Attendees will learn how to effectively use technology to help build teacher capacity. You will also learn how to create and share information using vehicles such as YouTube, LiveBinder, Symbaloo and Seesaw. During this interactive presentation/workshop, attendees will have an opportunity to practice using these tools. Technology tools will be supplemented with hands-on materials and ideas for enriching literacy practice in your schools.
    Required Materials: A device 

    LCG-16
    Literacy Centers: Developing Skills in Reading and Writing (Grades K-2)

    Merisa Rosa, Principal, Knollwood Elementary School, NJ
    It can be a challenge to facilitate a guided reading lesson (or facilitate guiding reading) while the other students are working independently. This session will provide you with tools and strategies necessary to effectively implement literacy centers in your primary classroom. It will also provide a myriad of creative ways to plan for literacy center driven instruction. 

    LCG-17
    (Co)ach Teaching: A Synthesis of Best Practices in Coaching and Co-Teaching to Boost Student Outcomes and Professional Development (Grades PreK-8)

    Andrea Vargas, Literacy Coach, Needham Public Schools, MA
    Jessica Peterson, Principal, Needham Public Schools, MA
    Holly McMackin, Literacy Coach, Needham Public Schools, MA 
    Lindsey Sawyer, Math Coach, Needham Public Schools, MA

    Coaching and co-teaching yield great gains in partnering educators, supporting students and developing capacity to meet diverse learning needs. This session examines where coaching moves and co-teaching models intersect and contrast. Through videos, looking at student work, and analyzing authentic data, we'll explore one school’s year-long launch in (co)ach teaching cycles in three classrooms spanning grades 2-5. Discover how to select instructional models when balancing and integrating these approaches to maximize student growth and achievement. 

    LCG-18
    Beyond Leveled Texts: Using Leveled Texts as a Scaffold to Authentic Literature Readings (Grades K-2)

    Becky Voight, Literacy Coach/Staff Development/Reading Recovery, Denton Independent School District, TX
    Katrena Leininger, Literacy Coach/Staff Development/Reading Recovery, Denton Independent School District, TX

    This session will explore the idea that in a reader-centered classroom leveled texts are one useful scaffold towards becoming a reader. The ultimate goal is to read and understand authentic literature. 

    LCG-19
    Joyful Read-Aloud Experiences: Creating a Caring Classroom (Grades K-2)

    Maria Walther, First Grade Teacher, Indian Praire Dis. 204, IL 
    Are you looking for picture books that showcase social-emotional learning, growth mindset and creativity? If so, this idea-packed session is for you! A veteran first-grade teacher will show you how to engage in interactive read-aloud experiences that elevate the conversations and thinking in your classroom. The books Maria shares will help you to nurture a caring community of active learners. Leave with a list of picture books and a wealth of practical classroom strategies! 

  • Reading Recovery Session G | 1:30 pm–3:00 pm

    RRG-1 — Featured
    Know When to Hold’em: The Power of Deliberate Pause (Repeat)

    Lori Taylor, Reading Recovery Trainer, University of Maine, ME
    Everything we say or don’t say, everything we do or don’t do, matters. Clay reminds us in Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals that to teach for accelerated learning, the teacher must “make highly skilled decisions moment by moment” using the “clearest, easiest, most memorable examples." We also know, both from the text and from experience, that teacher talk or moves can interfere and confuse. In this session, you'll explore the power of intentionally holding back, holding out, or pausing our response to provide the opportunity for the child to take action in processing print.

    RRG-2
    Teaching (only) from Correct and Partially Correct Responding

    Kelly L. McDermott, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Boston Public Schools, MA
    In Reading Recovery lessons, we must "find ways of letting children bring what they know together in a single problem-solving action or process." Clay tells us to "work with, and build on, what the child already knows." In this session, we will analyze video examples and running records, dig into Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals (2016 edition) and think about planning and reflecting in a deliberate manner to ensure we are teaching mostly (if not only) from students' correct and partially correct responding. We will spend time thinking about how essential it is that we are constantly observing students "for signs of what they understand and what they are grappling with [...] recognizing small gains in control even when there is clearly still much to learn" throughout their series of Reading Recovery lessons. 

Workshop Schedule
Questions
If you have any questions, please contact the Literacy for All Conference team