Workshop Titles and Descriptions

More Than 100 Workshops Over 3 Days

Sunday, October 20, 2019

  • Pre-Conference Workshops | 11:00 am–4:00 pm

    PC-1 
    A Fresh Look at Phonics

    Wiley Blevins, Author, Educational Consultant, NY
    Grades K-2: This session reviews the 7 key characteristics of strong phonics instruction, ways to ensure they are in place, and how to fine-tune them (if already in place) to maximize instructional success. Participants will examine the 10 common causes of phonics instructional failure and how to avoid them. This session is based on Blevins’ work with school districts- examining test scores vs. instructional tools and classroom practices to identify the mismatches and areas of weakness that impede or slow learning.

    PC-2 
    Getting the Most from the Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System(Grades K-6)

    Cindy Downend, Assistant Director, Primary Programs, Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA 
    Heather Rodman, Primary Faculty Trainer, Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA 

    Grades K-6: This session will take a fresh look at the Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment Systems 1 & 2, 3rd edition. We’ll begin with a focus on what it takes to hold efficient and effective conferences, sharing practical ways to administer the assessment. Then we will link assessment findings directly to planning for instruction. We will discuss and provide models for using assessment results to plan for individual, small-group, and whole-class instruction and use The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum to connect assessment with instruction that builds on students’ strengths as readers.
    Required Text: Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System Assessment Guide and The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum to participate in this session.

    PC-4
    Minilessons to Get Started with Book Clubs 1-8; Thinking and Talking About Books

    Irene Fountas Author, Founder, Director, Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA
    Gay Su Pinnell, Author, Professor Emerita, Ohio State University, OH

    Grades K-8: Classrooms need to be places where students engage in literacy learning for a lifetime of thinking and talking about books. Learn how to plan a series of minilessons to engage small groups of your students in enjoying books and talking about them so they can develop a deeper understanding than any one student could get from reading the text alone. Your students will get to know each other and learn the social conventions of small group discussion that they will need across the grades. In this institute you will observe a book club discussion based on The Crossover by Kwame Alexander to identify essential elements of productive conversations and the competencies your students will need across the grades.
    Required Text: Fountas & Pinnell Prompting Guide Part 2 for Comprehension: Thinking, Talking, and Writing (available for purchase prior to the institute).


    PC-6
    Picturebooks in the Reading Workshop

    Frank Serafini, Professor, Arizona State University, AZ 
    Grades 3-6: Classroom teachers need to develop the analytic skills and vocabularies to discuss the multimodal aspects (text, image, and design elements) in contemporary picturebooks. In addition, they need to be able to effectively demonstrate the strategies needed to comprehend these elements in contemporary picturebooks. This session will present numerous ways to use picture books to develop reading strategies in readers across the Grade 3-8 Reading Workshop.

    Reading Recovery Pre-Conference Workshops | 11:00 am–4:00 pm

    PC-3
    Fostering Accelerated Progress for English Language Learners in Reading Recovery

    Annette Torres Elias, Reading Recovery, Descubriendo la Lectura Trainer and Associate Professor, Department of Reading, Texas Woman's University, TX
    Reading Recovery: In this session we will discuss how to design Reading Recovery instruction to effectively address the needs of emergent bilingual students (English Language Learners). Participants will learn about the language development of bilingual students and explore specific ways to analyze and reflect on lesson records to better understand how to support their students.

    PC-5
    Phrasing and a Child’s Self-extending System

    James R. Schnug, Reading Recovery Trainer, The Ohio State University, OH
    Reading Recovery: Phrased reading is too often viewed as an “outcome” of a child’s developing self-extending system rather than a major contributor to a child’s progress early on in her program. This work session for Reading Recovery teachers will review and develop rationales and teaching moves that place phrased reading as an important “accelerator” in the child’s intervention.
    Required Text: LLDI 2nd ed.

Monday, October 21, 2019

  • Session A | 8:30 am–10:00 am

    Keynote Session
    Creating a World for All Through Literacy

    Kwame Alexander, Poet, Educator, Author 
    During this lively keynote, Kwame will discuss how the right books can breathe life into your classroom and into your students’ hearts and how poetry can create lifelong lovers of literature.

  • Session B | 10:30 am–12:00 pm

    LCB-1 — Featured
    Minilessons to Get Started with Readers’ Notebooks (Grades 2-8)

    Irene Fountas Author, Founder, Director, Professor, Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA
    Gay Su Pinnell, Author, Professor Emerita, The Ohio State University, OH

    Grades 1-8: A reader’s notebook is a vessel for your students’ thinking about books across the school year. Learn how to plan a series of minilessons for introducing and using readers’ notebooks and engaging your students in a variety of written responses to reflect on their reading. When students think, talk, and write about their reading, they develop their reading identities and build a deeper understanding of books. Learn how to help students use the notebook to expand their reading engagement and competencies. In addition, find out ways you can respond efficiently and effectively to your students in their notebooks to lift their understandings through your personal responses. Participants will receive an intermediate reader’s notebook at this session.

    LCB-2 — Featured
    Nurturing Young Writers: Using Mentor Texts Throughout Writing Workshop K-2

    Matt Glover, Author, Consultant, Cincinnati, OH
    Grades K-2: Children are better able to compose powerful writing when they have a clear vision for what they are making and are immersed in a stack of real world texts. Use authentic strategies for using mentor texts at four specific time in writing workshop including,using a stack of texts to project units of study, immersing students in a stack at the beginning of a unit, as the starting point for minilessons, and as a tool for teaching during writing conferences. In addition, we will examine the important role of reading like a writer to support students in noticing techniques authors use in their own writing.

    LCB-3 — Featured
    When Books Become Best Friends: One Book/Many Visits

    Lester Laminack, Author, Consultant, Dillsboro, NC
    Grades K-5: Explore the potential of revisiting a small collection of carefully selected books through focused read aloud experiences across time. Imagine slowing down to explore a small set of books in layers, one layer at a time with a clear focus for each read aloud experience. Lester will take you through the potential of a few picture books to demonstrate what can be done with numerous well-loved Best Friend Books because he understands that to be a good writer you must first be able to read deeply and understand author’s intent. Lester Laminack will show you that the key to successful writing is harnessing the power of close reading. You will learn how your students can transfer what they know about reading structures and strategies into practices that will hone their writing skills and help them become more focused writers.

    LCB-4 — Featured
    Practicing Presence: Mindfulness and Social Emotional Awareness Intersect (K-8)

    Lisa J. Lucas, Professor, West Chester University, PA 
    Grades K-5: Explore the potential of revisiting a small collection of carefully selected books through focused read aloud experiences across time. Imagine slowing down to explore a small set of books in layers, one layer at a time with a clear focus for each read aloud experience. Lester will take you through the potential of a few picture books to demonstrate what can be done with numerous well-loved Best Friend Books because he understands that to be a good writer you must first be able to read deeply and understand author’s intent. Lester Laminack will show you that the key to successful writing is harnessing the power of close reading. You will learn how your students can transfer what they know about reading structures and strategies into practices that will hone their writing skills and help them become more focused writers.

    LCB-5 — Featured
    Reading the Visual: Teaching Multimodal Literacies

    Frank Serafini, Professor, Arizona State University, AZ  
    Grades 3-8: Literacy educators need to expand their abilities to demonstrate how to approach, navigate, and comprehend visual and multimodal texts. This session will focus on aspects of visual and multimodal literacy, in particular the strategies, vocabulary, and foundations for making sense of contemporary multimodal texts like picture books, advertisements, and illustrated novels.

    LCB-6 
    What's Your Story?  Creating and Writing Children's Educational Books

    Marcie Aboff, Children's Author, Somerset, NJ
    Children's Literature and Authors: Teachers are in an ideal position to write children’s educational books. Children’s author Marcie Aboff will show you how she writes her educational and trade books.  This workshop will cover idea conceptualization, manuscript drafts, editorial feedback, revisions, and final projects. She’ll share information about the publishing market - how to research publishers and editors, submit proposals, and brainstorm to see what educational books and supplemental material could enhance the learning for your students.

    LCB-7
    Co-Planning: Why We Did it, How We Did it, and What We Learned

    Brett Berkman Literacy Coach, Framingham Public Schools, MA 
    Abby Hendler, Literacy Coach, Framingham Public Schools, MA 

    Literacy Coaches: Steve Jobs said, “Great things in business are never done by one person. They're done by a team of people.” In our school district, we adopted a  co-planning structure which enabled us to work as grade level teams to plan our weekly lessons. There were many challenges, but in the end, our teachers and children benefited from the team approach. Attend this session to learn about how we did it and what we learned.

    LCB-8
    Where Common Core and Balanced Literacy Meet

    Kara Brockett, Elementary School Principal, DREAM Charter School, NY 
    Carmen Issac, Middle School Academic Dean, DREAM Charter School, NY

    Grades 3-6: Where does the common core and balanced literacy intersect? A thoughtful curricular approach that meets the rigor of common core while staying true to balanced literacy model is not only possible, but highly effective. In this interactive workshop, we will plan where our instruction will drive towards end of year benchmarks, while simultaneously be responsive to the needs of our students.

    LCB-9
    Examining Voice as a Tool for Revision and Publication

    Karen Caine, Writing Workshop Consultant, Independent Consultant, NJ
    Amy Ludwig Vanderwater, Children's Book Author, Holland, NY

    Grades 3-6: Voice matters, but rarely do we help students use their actual voices to lift the music of their language while drafting and revising. Join us in exploring voice through storytelling, revision, and publication in writing workshop.  Together we will examine ways to help children listen to each other’s voices and their own, deepening craft and strengthening tone. Teachers will gain clear, simple strategies to help students revise and share writing...with voice at the center."

    LCB-10
    Empowering Readers: Affinity Group Book Clubs That Affirm Student Identities

    Sonja Cherry-Paul, Author and Literacy Consultant, LitLearnAct, NY
    Dana Johansen, Author, Literacy Consultant, LitLearnAct, NY 

    Grades 5-8: Affinity group book clubs are safe havens for students who feel marginalized in their schools and in the world.  Benefits include affirming students’ identities in spaces where they feel valued, included, and empowered. They can transform “reluctant” readers into ravenous readers when they encounter characters who mirror their lives. Through reading and discussing texts students critique and expand the boundaries of society-imposed norms.

    LCB-11
    Kids On Air: Amplifying Student Voice through Digital Making

    Jacey Edelman, Assistant Director, Lesley STEAM Learning Lab, MA
    Sue Cusack, Assistant Professor at Lesley University, Director of Lesley STEAM Learning Lab, MA
    Rashmi Pimprikar, Program Director, STEAM + Computer Science, Lesley STEAM Learning Lab, MA

    Technology and Literacy: Through the innovative use of digital making tools, participants will deepen strategies for student language acquisition and oral fluency. Using developmentally appropriate tools for either tablets or Chromebooks, this session will provide a platform for students to create their own public service announcements, interactive eBooks, and stop motion animations. We will highlight the many ways to capture student voice with outcomes that make it possible to present student work to an authentic audience. Meet the new Massachusetts Digital Literacy and Computer Science (DLCS) standards alongside your literacy curriculum for K-8th grades.

    LCB-12
    Writer's Notebooks with Younger Students

    Miriam Morrison, Teacher, Wayland Public Schools, MA
    Gretchen Knox, Teacher, Wayland Public Schools, MA

    Grades K-2: In this workshop, we will show how K-2 teachers can use Writer’s Notebooks to meet the Common Core standards. We have developed lessons for younger writers responding in notebooks and using the notebook as another teacher in the classroom.  We will provide you with a sample Writer’s Notebook, as well as titles of mentor texts that anchor our writing instruction, and the child-centered handouts that complement those lessons.

    LCB-13
    Some of Our Best Friends Are Books: Writing With Mentor Texts (and Others)

    Nancy L. Peterson, Professor, Teacher Education, Utah Valley University, School of Education, UT 
    Keri Measom-Francis, Lecturer, Elementary Education, Utah Valley University, School of Education, UT 
    Grades 3-6: Looking for authentic ways to match learning to write with a love for it? Discover how modeling joy in writing for and with your students, bridging school and home literacy acquisition, using authors and their books as co-teachers, highlighting student work, and immersing students in their own relationships with favorite texts will help inspire them to imitate, simulate, and emulate good writing and writers.  Finding the best mentors involves bonding, and the whole world can use a lot more of that.

    LCB-14
    It's All About Trust: Three Methods for Teaching Reading Impactfully

    Jennifer Scoggin, Director, LitLife CT, LLC, CT
    Hannah Schneewind, Lead Literacy Consultant, LitLife CT, LLC, CT

    Grades K-2: We invite you to consider the vital role of trust, agency and joy in the impactful teaching of reading.  Building on classroom experiences and research regarding feedback, engagement and motivation, this session empowers teachers to re-tool their conferring, mini lesson and read aloud practices to return to what students need most as readers.  The presenters will incorporate videos, notetaking strategies and sample lessons as they explore how to collaborate with students to create agentive reading experiences.

    LCB-15
    Essential Elements for the Coaching and Supervision of Guided Reading

    Helen Sisk, Trainer, Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA
    Literary Coaches: This session will support coaches and principals in holding conversations with teachers about decisions in guided reading lessons. When teachers understand the purpose and procedures of guided reading, your conversations can engage them in reflection that expands their expertise and improves the effectiveness of the teaching. Key elements for development include text selection, teaching decisions before, during, and after the reading, and using assessment to guide planning.

    LCB-16
    Amplify Interactive Read Alouds and Whole Class Conversations

    Courtney Varner, Primary Literacy Trainer, Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA
    Grades K-2: John Hatti reminds us that “…cognitive development is a social process prompted by high-quality dialogue among peers supported by teachers.” Come experience an interactive read aloud and engage in a discussion with colleagues. Consider the impact on students and explore an interactive read aloud planning process which foster students discourse and cultivates deep thinking. Materials needed: a picture book you might use with students in your classroom.

    LCB-17
    For the Love of Language: Empowering  ELs in Early Childhood Classrooms

    Vincent Ventura, Director, LitLife International, Monterrey, Mexico 
    Grades PreK-K: Do you work with early readers, writers, speakers and listeners? If that's the case, this session is for you! In this interactive workshop, we will explore best practice strategies for teaching reading, writing and oral language that highlight the strengths of the learning child in a multilingual world. Through discussion, demonstration and practice, everyone will be empowered to teach English learners in an early childhood classroom. Fasten your seat belts and join the fun!

    LCB-18
    Collaborative Model: Principal/Coach Team Leads Systemic Change in Literacy Best Practice

    Darcy Williams, Elementary School Principal, Curriculum, Fonda-Fultonville Elementary School, NY
    Sharon Kline, Literacy Coach, Fonda-Fultonville Elementary School, NY

    Administrators/School Leaders: Learn how to use your Literacy Committee to empower and support your teachers to embrace best literacy practice. A Literacy Coach and Elementary Principal share their research based, data driven model of balanced literacy. The research of Allington, Calkins, Marzano and others was used as a lens to analyze data gathered from assessments such as, iReady, running records and teacher conferring notes. Then best practice methodologies were implemented in classrooms. The result? Improved student achievement and a  school wide culture that fosters lifelong readers and writers. Participants will leave this session with strategies and inspired to replicate this work in their own districts."

  • Reading Recovery Session B | 10:30 am–12:00 pm

    RRB-1 — Featured
    Letter Identification and Fast Visual Processing

    C.C. Bates, Director, Clemson University Reading Recovery and Early Literacy Training Center for South Carolina, SC 
    Reading Recovery: We know from LLDI that there “is a short segment in the lesson in which children must learn fast identification of all the letter shapes and features.” So, what does this mean when children are at the board for letter work and how do we connect this short segment across the lesson? C.C.’s session will uncover the importance of fast visual processing and the ways in which it links to children’s fluency and flexibility in reading and writing.

    RRB-2 — Featured
    Reading Recovery’s Wonderfully Disturbing Messages

    James R. Schnug, Reading Recovery Trainer, The Ohio State University, OH
    Reading Recovery: It has been 34 years since Reading Recovery was introduced in the United States, and its messages continue to wonderfully disturb how teachers and administrators organize to provide effective early literacy intervention. Beginning with Clay’s Literacy Processing Theory, Schnug will outline what he considers to be the most salient messages from Reading Recovery that effectively challenge and readjust his and any teacher’s and administrator’s response to struggling first grade readers.

    RRB-3
    Teaching and Prompting During the New Book: Change Over Time

    Scott Mackin, Teacher Leader, North Central WI Reading Recovery Consortium, WI 
    Reading Recovery: When do we provide information?  When do we prompt? When do we do something else? We will examine videos of my teaching and explore how teaching and prompting change over time.

  • Session C | 1:30 pm–3:00 pm

    LCC-1 — Featured
    Increasing Engagement in Writers Through Choice of Genre

    Matt Glover, Author, Consultant, Cincinnati, OH 
    Grades K-6: Choice, in any area of learning, increases energy and engagement. In writing, teachers often grapple with choice of topic, but less frequently consider choice of genre. Yet, choice of genre significantly impacts engagement, especially for reluctant writers. In this session we will make the case for including some writing workshop units of study each year that allow for choice of genre. We will also troubleshoot common challenges of non-genre specific studies, pulling stacks of texts, and conferring.

    LCC-2 — Featured
    Writing Conditions: Seven Necessities Students Need to Flourish as Writers

    Brian Kissel, Professor of the Practice of Literacy,  Vanderbilt University, TN 
    Grades 2-8: In this session, participants will learn about the seven key conditions necessary in order for writers to thrive in the classroom: time, choice, response, demonstration, expectation, room structure, and evaluation. Participants will learn how to create these conditions by crafting a plan to embed these elements within their classrooms.

    LCC-3 — Featured
    Building a House of Fiction on a Foundation of Non-Fiction

    Lester Laminack, Author, Consultant, Dillsboro, NC 
    Grades 2-5: We will explore the idea of delving into nonfiction through the doorway of fiction. Lester will take you on an exploration of one topic beginning with two fiction selections that will set up an exploration of moving through a series of nonfiction texts moving deeper and deeper into the topic. 

    LCC-4 — Featured
    Social Justice Does Not Just Live in Our Content, It Lives in Our Methods

    Cornelius Minor, Author, Educational Consultant, NY
    Grades K-8: We know the research. Girls are underrepresented in science and technology. Children of color continue to be suspended at exponential rates compared to their white peers. Poor children are more likely to attend schools with fewer resources. These outcomes are sexist. They are racist. They are classist. School, as an institution, continues to perpetuate them. People often ask, “How can schools be sexist or racist or classist if I’m not?” Systems of oppression continue to work against children—despite our best intentions. This presentation will explore how grading practices, classroom routines, teaching methodologies, discipline codes and other school structures can perpetuate the kinds of exclusion that keep poor children, girls, LGBTQIA+ children, disabled children and children of color from fully accessing and benefiting from a school curriculum. We will study how inquiry/action research can be a tool that practitioners use to dismantle these structures and to change them to truly benefit all learners.

    LCC-5 — Featured
    Talking with Children About Books

    Frank Serafini, Professor, Arizona State University, AZ
    Grades 3-6: This workshop session will focus on helping students move beyond literal responses to fictional texts. A variety of discussion strategies will be presented that provide opportunities for classroom teachers to expand students’ responses to literature and reconsider the structures and supports for the discussions that occur in their classrooms.

    LCC-6 — Featured
    Student-Centered Coaching

    Diane Sweeney, Lead Consultant, Diane Sweeney Consulting, CO 
    Literacy Coaches: If you are an instructional or literacy coach, you’ve probably wondered how (of if) your work is influencing student learning and teaching practice. Join us to learn how Student-Centered Coaching does just that. The core practices for Student-Centered will be introduced and participants will be given the opportunity to reflect on how to use these practices with teachers. Never again will you have to wonder if you are making an impact, as this approach is designed to ensure that you do. This session is recommended for coaches, principals, district leaders and teachers who are interested in coaching.

    LCC-7 
    Creating Meaningful/Authentic Writing Clubs in Writers’ Workshop

    Kerry Crosby, Adjunct Faculty, Literacy Consultant, Lesley University and Heinemann Publishing, MA
    Kristine Haveles-Pelletier, District Literacy Implementation Specialist, K-5, Manchester Public Schools, NH
    Alison Zylstra, 6th Grade Teacher, Bennington Rutland Supervisory Union, VT

    Grades 3-6: This seminar will focus on how to set up authentic writing clubs in which kids have the opportunity to share their work, their excitement for writing, and their struggles with fellow writers. We will discuss how to create small communities of writers who not only feel comfortable offering constructive feedback, but actually seek it from their peers.  Through video and hands-on work, we will explore the roles of the teacher and students during writing clubs in both primary and intermediate classrooms.

    LCC-8 
    I AM ABLE: Cultivating a Community of Powerful Identities

    Lindsay Duch, Literacy Collaborative Coach, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA
    Courtney Varner, Primary Literacy Trainer, Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA
    Katie Fowle, Consultant, VA

    Grades K-5: We are reminded by Peter Johnston,“If nothing else, children should leave school with a sense that if they act, and act strategically, they can accomplish their goals.” Come explore the conditions that impact students who act. Teachers will learn a conferencing process that equips literacy learners to be self-directed and mindful decision-makers.

    LCC-9 
    Keep Kids Turning Pages: An Author's View

    Susan E. Goodman, Author and Faculty, Low-residency MFA for Creative Writing, Lesley University, MA
    Children's Literature and Authors: Authors write books; teachers bring books to life by helping kids read and understand them. Different jobs, but shared goals and challenges: engaging our audience--even with new, difficult information--then keep kids reading to the end. An author of 30+ books, Goodman discusses five elements/approaches that engross readers, why they encourage enthusiasm or determination, then offers ways to adapt these elements to the classroom.

    LCC-10 
    Stop Blaming the iPhone: Ways to Turn Schools into Snappy-Chat Hubs for Lifelong Readers

    Berit Gordon, Literacy Consultant, NJ
    Grades 5-8: In this presentation, participants will see ten easy-to-implement strategies to create a culture of reading, to help students get to know one another and their teachers through books, and to help entire school communities take joy in becoming lifelong readers.

    LCC-11 
    Teaching Main Idea & Beyond:  Help Students Think Deeply about Nonfiction

    Renee Houser, Author, Consultant, Renee Houser, LLC, NY
    Gravity Goldberg, Author, Consultant, Gravity Goldberg, LLC, NY

    Grades 3-6: We’ve all spent too much time teaching text features and main idea and are still left with lackluster engagement and a false sense of student comprehension. The two most important aspects of nonfiction reading entail synthesizing information and understanding perspectives. We’ll share powerful ways to help students synthesize their thinking right now, and overtime, so that students experience true comprehension.  Readers must think about multiple perspectives in nonfiction texts, both their own and others, in order to be critical consumers of information. We’ll show lessons that are applicable to students of all ages that support teachers in making this complicated work approachable.

    LCC-12 
    Reigniting Word Study: Jumpstarting Curious, Multi-Faceted, and JOYFUL Word Exploration

    Pamela Koutrakos, Educational Consultant & Author, Gravity Goldberg, LLC, NJ 
    Grades 3-6: Word study getting you down? Interested in amplifying playfulness and student choice? Let’s discuss building a more playful approach to word study. Together, we will explore the structures and routines of an engaged word study classroom. Ideas for creative and inquiry-driven practices will be demonstrated. A step-by-step plan for preparing students to make thoughtful choices will be outlined. We can cultivate curiosity around words so students are excited by and invested in word exploration.

    LCC-13
    School-wide Literacy: Ignite & Improve Literacy Engagement, Create Lifelong Readers

    Adriana Leal Lankenau, Literacy Coach, Euroamerican School of Monterrey Campus Valle, Mexico
    Erika Orozco Meraz, Literacy Coach, Euroamerican School of Monterrey Campus Valle, Mexico

    Literacy Coaches: Different school-wide strategies and activities for igniting, developing and improving literacy from PreK to Grade 8 will be shared in this session. The strategies shown will allow participants to implement different ways of reaching students and improving reading and writing levels among the school community. While sharing their learning journey the presenters will use real examples and evidence of the good, the bad and the “what's next?” of each one of their projects and campaigns.

    LCC-14
    Application Not Isolation: Using Authentic Text to Make Phonics Meaningful

    Elise Lund, Author and Literacy Consultant, Corwin Literacy, NC
    Grades K-2: Phonics is the key for all students to access complex text. This lofty goal is achieved when students apply their learning early and often to connected text. This session helps teachers plan authentic phonics lessons characterized by direct instruction with clear learning targets and direct connections to reading and writing. Teachers will learn diverse strategies for teaching fluency and comprehension and understand how to structure classroom time and space to implement effective phonics instruction.

    LCC-15
    It's All About Stories

    Cheryl Paul, Assistant Professor, Early Childhood Educator, Rhode Island College, RI 
    Elizabeth Orton, Assistant Professor, Early Childhood Educator, Rhode Island College, RI

    Grades PreK-K: Do you want your students to be confident and self-regulated, develop language skills, increase phonemic awareness and recognize the components of a story? Story telling is a joyful way to meet these goals. This workshop will present new ideas for story telling in your classroom. We will explore various activities such as dictating and acting out a story, telling a story from a drawing, participating in a group story, and creating a class journal.

    LCC-16
    Teaching Students to Craft Sentences with Style

    Jen Sanders, Literacy Coach, Brookline Public School, MA
    Jen Deranian, 6th Grade Writing Teacher, Brookline Public School, MA

    Grades 5-8: Research shows that traditional grammar instruction is not only ineffective, but can be a detriment to students’ growth as writers. How, then, do we help our students grow their ability to craft a variety of sentences structures that infuse their writing with voice and style and allow them to communicate sophisticated ideas? Sentence Style! Join us to experience engaging activities that get kids excited to imitate and create sentences that WOW readers … and themselves!

    LCC-17
    Ignite Early Literacy Behaviors Through Shared Reading

    Julie Sneed, Primary Faculty Trainer, Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA
    Grades K-2: Discover the power of shared reading as a place to find joy in reading, solidify a community of literacy learners, and bolster early reading behaviors. Think together about how to connect early assessments to goals for teaching as well as clear instructional language.

    LCC-18
    Hands Down, Speak Out

    Christy Thompson, Literacy Coach, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA
    Kassia Omohundro Wedekind, Math Coach, Stenhouse Publishers, VA

    Grades K-2: We know it is essential to provide opportunities for students to talk about text. But too often the content, flow and outcome of the talk is owned by the teacher. This session will explore how we use “Hands-Down Conversations” to shift ownership of classroom conversations from the teacher to the students. Participants will learn how to implement this structure, hone their listening and facilitating skills and plan dialogue micro-lessons in response to what they notice.

  • Reading Recovery Session C | 1:30 pm–3:00 pm

    RRC-1 — Featured
    Letter Identification and Fast Visual Processing (Repeat)

    C.C. Bates, Director, Clemson University Reading Recovery and Early Literacy Training Center for South Carolina, SC
    Reading Recovery: We know from LLDI that there “is a short segment in the lesson in which children must learn fast identification of all the letter shapes and features.” So, what does this mean when children are at the board for letter work and how do we connect this short segment across the lesson? C.C.’s session will uncover the importance of fast visual processing and the ways in which it links to children’s fluency and flexibility in reading and writing.

    RRC-2 — Featured
    It is Like Having Two Hands!

    Annette Torres Elias, Reading Recovery, Descubriendo la Lectura Trainer and Associate Professor, Department of Reading, Texas Woman's University, TX 
    Reading Recovery: Reading and writing are two different ways of learning the written code used to record oral language. The writing segment of the Reading Recovery lesson is replete with opportunities for strategic processing. Participants will discuss the power of reciprocity and learn to look for signals of progress in writing.

    RRC-3 — Featured
    Reading Recovery’s Wonderfully Disturbing Messages (Repeat)

    James R. Schnug, Reading Recovery Trainer, The Ohio State University, OH
    Reading Recovery: It has been 34 years since Reading Recovery was introduced in the United States, and its messages continue to wonderfully disturb how teachers and administrators organize to provide effective early literacy intervention. Beginning with Clay’s Literacy Processing Theory, Schnug will outline what he considers to be the most salient messages from Reading Recovery that effectively challenge and readjust his and any teacher’s and administrator’s response to struggling first grade readers.

  • Session D | 3:30 pm–5:00 pm

    LCD-1 — Featured
    Patterns of Power: Inviting Young Writers into the Conventions of Language, Grades 1-5

    Jeff Anderson, Author, Portsmouth, NH
    Grades 1-5: Meaning is made when reading and writing crash together in the conventions of language. Where do concept formation and mentor texts fit in? Come discover brain-based, practical ways to use the reading and writing connection to teach grammar and editing in a way that enhances composition and comprehension.

    LCD-2 — Featured
    CAFE 2.0: Teach the Students in Front of You

    Gail Boushey, Author and Educator, The Daily CAFE, WA 
    Allison Behne,
     Author and Educator, The Daily CAFE, WA
    Grades K-5: Since it is our job to teach, we benefit from committing to memory a lesson framework that is effective, flexible, differentiated, and keeps thinking at the heart, allowing our brains to have enough cognitive capacity to make decisions and mental pivots in the moment with students. Join us to learn the framework that makes this responsive teaching and student learning possible. This session will highlight our four-step plan to design and deliver effective instruction.

    LCD-3 — Featured
    Clever Writers Become Critical Readers - Writing Skills Can Transform Comprehension

    M. Colleen Cruz, Director of Innovation, Teachers College Reading & Writing Project, Columbia University, NY
    Grades 3-8: Many teachers are used to taking advantage of links between reading and writing, typically introducing a genre through reading and looking to texts as mentors for writing pieces crafted later. Colleen will assert there is another way - that teaching writing first and explicitly teaching students to reflect on choices they make as writers are powerful tools for teaching critical reading comprehension. When students, as captains of their writing, start to recognize the tricks of the trade in the texts they read, their reading comprehension becomes more active and nuanced.

    LCD-4 — Featured
    Increasing Engagement in Writers Through Choice of Genre (Repeat)

    Matt Glover, Author, Consultant, Cincinnati, OH 
    Grades K-6: Choice, in any area of learning, increases energy and engagement. In writing, teachers often grapple with choice of topic, but less frequently consider choice of genre. Yet, choice of genre significantly impacts engagement, especially for reluctant writers. In this session we will make the case for including some writing workshop units of study each year that allow for choice of genre. We will also troubleshoot common challenges of non-genre specific studies, pulling stacks of texts, and conferring.

    LCD-5 — Featured
    Authors as “Author”ities in the Author’s Chair

    Brian Kissel, Professor of the Practice of Literacy, Vanderbilt University, TN
    Grades K-5: In this session, teachers learn how to allow their writers to drive the Author’s Chair. When given choices for feedback, authors direct audience towards the type of response they need: gathering ideas, working through their process, connections, compliments, and questions. Teachers will learn ways to deepen and record the feedback that happens at the Author’s Chair so they can make more informed decisions when planning writing instructions.

    LCD-6 — Featured
    Writers ARE Readers: Reading Structures and Strategies to Nurture More Powerful Writers

    Lester Laminack, Author, Consultant, Dillsboro, NC 
    Grades 3-8: To be a good writer you must first be able to read deeply and understand author’s intent. In this workshop, Lester Laminack will show you that the key to successful writing is harnessing the power of close reading. You will learn how your students can transfer what they know about reading structures and strategies into practices that will hone their writing skills and help them become more focused writers.

    LCD-7 — Featured
    Writing Your Prescription for a Balanced Life: Wellness in the Workplace

    Lisa J. Lucas, Professor, West Chester University, PA 
    Grades K-8: Designed to incorporate writing and reflection as a catalyst to uncover unconscious habits and exchange them with sustainable self-care strategies, this session provides practices to cultivate simple routines to protect against burnout and boredom. We need a systems approach to wellness in the workplace, and it begins with us This retreat-like session will offer a unique opportunity to discover tools to assist you in creating a more joyful, meaningful life.

    LCD-8 — Featured
    The Power of Purposeful Talk: Exploring and Building Dialogic Classrooms

    Maria Nichols, Teacher, Administrator, Author, Consultant, San Diego Unified School District, CA
    Grades K-6: The ability to talk purposefully and productively with others is foundational to learning. But, what is purposeful talk, and how do we teach in ways that enable talk - and children - to flourish? This workshop explores dialogic classrooms, emphasizing processes that support students in using talk to construct bold ideas and understandings. The changing role of the teacher will be considered, with examples of facilitation strategies that support student’s efforts.

    LCD-9 — Featured
    Providing Strengths-Based Feedback in Coaching Conversations

    Diane Sweeney, Lead Consultant, Diane Sweeney Consulting, CO
    Literacy Coaching: The research regarding feed back is clear. It is essential for learning to occur. Without feedback, the learner is unclear about the steps to take to improve. With feedback, there is a vision for what the learner can do to move their learning forward. In this session, participants will learn a three-step process for providing strengths-based feedback to teachers. Videos and scenarios will be used to provide opportunities to reflect and practice. This session is recommended for coaches, principals, district leaders, and teachers who are interested in coaching.

    LCD-10 — Featured
    Developing Student Understanding of Figurative Language to Support Comprehension

    Jerry Zutell, Professor Emeritus, Textbook Author, The Ohio State University, OH
    Grades 3-8: In this presentation we will briefly review the definition of figurative language, its many forms, and its pervasiveness across all types of texts. The instructor will then focus on various activities for developing students’ sensitivity to and knowledge of a wide range of useful figurative expressions.

    LCD-11
    Empowering Readers by Building a Strong Literacy Community

    Stephanie Affinito, Literacy Teacher Educator, University at Albany, NY
    Shelley Fenton, Literacy Coach, South Glen Falls CSD, NY
    Krista Senatore, Literacy Coach, Schuylerville CSD, NY 

    Grades 3-6: A vibrant literacy community is key to empowering readers in the classroom. In this session educators will explore opportunities for enriching their reading lives and the lives of their students. Participants will learn how to create a culture of avid readers, will gain tools to build a literate life and learn about initiatives to strengthen a literacy community.

    LCD-12
    Mindful Learners: Embedding Social and Emotional Skills in Literacy Workshops

    Mary Anne Buckley, K/1 Multi-age teacher, Naples, NY 
    Grades K-2: When students do not know how to regulate their behaviors, they invariably use ineffective, unproductive and disruptive behaviors to get their needs met. Friendship Workshop is a conscious approach to helping children identify and regulate their emotions, so they can make choices that support their relationships and their academics. Learn lessons that engage the hearts of students with authentic and thought-provoking conversation while covering the curriculum in engaging, challenging and creative ways.

    LCD-13
    The Wonderful World of Wordless Picture Books

    Jennifer Dare, Kindergarten Teacher, The School at Columbia University, NY
    Lauren Pemberton, Assistant Lower School Division Head for Kindergarten, The Allen-Stevenson School, NY 

    Grades PreK-K: Need a way to motivate the readers and writers in your classroom? Come learn how studying wordless picture books in your classroom will help you build a community of confident readers and writers. Discover how wordless picture books teach children important literacy skills of book-handling, storytelling, sequencing, and much, much more. In this session, participants will learn the power of these texts and ways to use them to invigorate their literacy instruction.

    LCD-14
    How Grade Level Team Coaching leads to School Improvement

    Kimberly DiFusco, District Trainer, Literacy Coach, Bristol Public Schools, CT 
    David Huber, Principal, Bristol Public Schools, CT  

    Administrators and School Leaders: In this session a Principal and Literacy Coach will explain the process their school uses to boost reading achievement, through grade level team coaching/collaboration meetings.

    LCD-15
    Integrating Writing into Content Areas for Deeper Understanding of Text Gr. 5-8

    Jennifer Hastings, Curriculum Specialist, Dalton Public Schools, GA
    Mitch Doxsee, Literacy Coach, Dalton Public Schools, GA
    Cassie Richardson, Literacy Coach, Dalton Public Schools, GA

    Grades 5-8: Teaching students a process for annotating a text while reading closely will lead students to deeper understandings across content areas increasing achievement. We will share how our district is working across grade levels to increase the quality, amount, and the rigor of writing assignments.  Teaching students to attack a more complex text and creating an inquiry stance within students’ increases student agency and the ability to produce quality writing.

    LCD-16
    This is What the Teachers Said

    Debra Lewis Hogate, Ph.D., Literacy Coach Trainer, University of Maine, ME
    Literacy Coaching: What do teachers say about coaching? What do they outline as the benefits of working with a literacy coach? What do they want coaches to know? This session will share the results of a study conducted to answer those questions and more. Attend this session and gain insight into the coach and teacher relationship as well as formulate a few questions of your own.

    LCD-17
    Increasing Text Accessibility Through Culturally Relevant Text

    Chris McAdoo, Senior Education Design Specialist, Kamehameha Schools, HI
    Tammy Miles, K-12 Curriculum Instruction Assessment Director, Kamehameha Schools, HI

    Grades K-2: Are your students' voices, cultures and storied places represented in the books they read? Join this session to learn how educators across Hawaii have partnered to address the need for culturally relevant informational texts for their students. Hawaiian educators used their own voices and expertise to write 40 books that support science, literacy, Hawaiian language and culture-based instruction. We will explore key characteristics of culture-based learning and how educators were engaged in a design process for creating culturally relevant informational texts that are standards based (NGSS, CCSS), promote leveled literacy, and amplify text accessibility for all learners.

    LCD-18
    We Got it From Here: Re-igniting Passion for Reading and Writing

    Julia E. Torres, Language Arts Teacher, Librarian, Denver Public Schools, CO
    Cornelius Minor, Author, Educational Consultant, NY 

    Technology and Literacy: In this professional development workshop, participants will experience best practices for reading and writing instruction in the digital age, and explore strategies for re-igniting passion for reading and writing in today's learners.  Participants will also explore ways to empower student readers and writers to use literacy as a tool of personal and collective transformation.

  • Reading Recovery Session D | 3:30 pm–5:00 pm

    RRD-1 — Featured
    It is Like Having Two Hands! (Repeat)

    Annette Torres Elias, Reading Recovery, Descubriendo la Lectura Trainer and Associate Professor, Department of Reading, Texas Woman's University  
    Reading Recovery: Reading and writing are two different ways of learning the written code used to record oral language. The writing segment of the Reading Recovery lesson is replete with opportunities for strategic processing. Participants will discuss the power of reciprocity and learn to look for signals of progress in writing.

    RRD-2 — Featured
    Beyond Reading and Writing: Upshots of Reading Recovery and Literacy Lessons

    Lori Taylor, Reading Recovery Trainer, University of Maine, ME 
    Reading Recovery: Reading Recovery and Literacy Lessons are interventions designed to change the trajectory of a child’s reading and writing achievement. A series of lessons can also benefit a child and the world around the child in many other ways. In this session, we will consider social and emotional outcomes associated with academic success in Reading Recovery and Literacy Lessons.

    RRD-3
    Fostering a Mindset for Problem Solving

    Kelly McDermott, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Boston Public Schools, MA
    Reading Recovery: During this session participants will spend time thinking about how essential it is that teaching fosters a mindset for problem solving. We will explore the idea that this teaching needs to occur from lesson one and build complexity in reading, writing and word work over the course of a week, a month and a series of lessons.

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

  • Session E | 8:30 am–10:00 am

    Keynote Reading
    The Words That Make Us Human:  Story as a Pathway to Literacy

    Carmen Agra Deedy, Children's Author, GA
    Literacy is critical for success in the work force, in personal communication, and as a tool for life-long learning. However, children who come from a culture where the written word is low on the hierarchy of needs - and ancillary to their daily lives - may show little interest in reading. How to reach them?  Where to begin the process? The answer, says award-winning author and story coach, Carmen Deedy, always begins with story.

  • Reading Recovery Session E | 8:30 am–10:00 am

    RRE-1 — Featured
    Maximizing the Power of the Cut-Up Story in Building a Strong Processing System

    Mary Rosser, Director, UTC for Reading Recovery and Comprehensive Literacy, University of Maine, ME 
    Reading Recovery: This session explores the power of the cut-up story in building upon and extending the strategic activity and processing power developed by students during the process of reading writing across the lesson.

    RRE-2 — Featured
    Beyond Reading and Writing: Upshots of Reading Recovery and Literacy Lessons (Repeat)

    Lori Taylor, Reading Recovery Trainer, University of Maine, ME
    Reading Recovery: Reading Recovery and Literacy Lessons are interventions designed to change the trajectory of a child’s reading and writing achievement. A series of lessons can also benefit a child and the world around the child in many other ways. In this session, we will consider social and emotional outcomes associated with academic success in Reading Recovery and Literacy Lessons.

    RRE-3
    “Bursting with Examples”:  Ways of Solving in Writing

    Maureen Bobbin, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Cambridge Public Schools, MA 
    Karen Tlili, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Cambridge Public Schools, MA 

    Reading Recovery: Clay states that the working page of the child’s writing book ""should be full of evidence of the variety of different ways of working on words...."" (Clay,  2016 p. 83).  Using Clay’s guidance, we will explore how to provide these opportunities for children to solve words in a variety of ways in each Reading Recovery lesson and the rationale behind doing so. We will reinforce how the ways of solving in writing can support student solving in reading. Student writing samples and videos will help us to extend our thinking.

    RRE-4
    Systematic Teaching for Strong Phonological Awareness and Phonics Competencies

    Laurel Dickey, Teacher Leader, Reading Recovery, Collaborative for Educational Services, MA 
    Reading Recovery: Advocates in the area of learning disabilities and Dyslexia are concerned that children experiencing reading difficulty receive specific teaching regarding phonological awareness and phonics. Learn how Reading Recovery teachers can ensure all students receive this support through systematic and powerful teaching during daily literacy lessons, specifically during taking words apart with magnetic letters, hearing and recording sounds in words, and linking sound sequence to letter sequence. We will explore record keeping that facilitates this work.

  • Session F | 10:30 am–12:00 pm

    LCF-1 — Featured
    Patterns of Power: Inviting Young Writers into the Conventions of Language, 1-5 (Repeat)

    Jeff Anderson, Author, Portsmouth, NH
    Grades 1-5: Meaning is made when reading and writing crash together in the conventions of language. Where do concept formation and mentor texts fit in? Come discover brain-based, practical ways to use the reading and writing connection to teach grammar and editing in a way that enhances composition and comprehension.

    LCF-2 — Featured
    7 Strategies to Engage All Students in Literacy Behaviors with the Daily 5

    Gail Boushey, Author and Educator, The Daily CAFE, WA
    Allison Behne, Author and Educator, The Daily CAFE, WA

    Grades K-6: A positive classroom environment is built on a foundation of respect. Learn 7 strategies to shift challenging behaviors to engaged behaviors that will help you and your students succeed within Daily 5 and throughout each day. Join us to create a learning community where all students can be successful.

    LCF-3 — Featured
    Reconsidering Reciprocity: The Dynamic Role of Writing in Reading Comprehension

    M. Colleen Cruz,Director of Innovation, Teachers College Reading & Writing Project, Columbia University, NY 
    Grades 3-8: Literacy teachers know that reading and writing are two sides of the same coin. However, many struggle with how to make that connection natural and meaningful for kids. In this session, using student work samples and opportunities for participants to read and write, Colleen will share dynamic and accessible ways for students to use their writing skills to strengthen their reading skills. This session will demonstrate how pairing the teaching of authentic writing with reading can demystify complex reading comprehension.

    LCF-4 — Featured
    Stories Teach!

    Carmen Agra Deedy,Children's Author, GA 
    Children's Literature and Authors: Join award-winning author Carmen Agra Deedy in a basic skills storytelling workshop. In this participatory event, the attendees will explore the fundamental components that comprise a solid oral story. Ms. Deedy believes storytelling is a natural pedagogical tool and an essential element in every great teacher's tool box!

    LCF-5 — Featured
    Writing Conditions: Seven Necessities Students Need to Flourish as Writers (Repeat)

    Brian Kissel, Professor of the Practice of Literacy, Vanderbilt University, TN
    Grades K-5: In this session, participants will learn about the seven key conditions necessary in order for writers to thrive in the classroom: time, choice, response, demonstration, expectation, room structure, and evaluation. Participants will learn how to create these conditions by crafting a plan to embed these elements within their classrooms.

    LCF-6 — Featured
    Practicing Presence: Mindfulness and Social-Emotional Awareness Intersect (K-8) (Repeat)

    Lisa J. Lucas, Professor, West Chester University, PA 
    Grades K-8: This session will empower the most important factor in a student’s learning; the teacher. This interactive presentation integrates literacy strategies with cutting edge research in neuroscience, mindfulness, and social emotional awareness. Discover how to train the mind and establish healthy habits and simple self-care strategies that can easily be incorporated into everyday life. In a world where everyone seems overly busy and overextended, practicing presence offers a much-needed change of pace.

    LCF-7 — Featured
    Social Justice Does Not Just Live in Our Content, It Lives in Our Methods (Repeat)

    Cornelius Minor, Author, Educational Consultant, NY
    Grades K-8: We know the research. Girls are underrepresented in science and technology. Children of color continue to be suspended at exponential rates compared to their white peers. Poor children are more likely to attend schools with fewer resources. These outcomes are sexist. They are racist. They are classist. School, as an institution, continues to perpetuate them. People often ask, “How can schools be sexist or racist or classist if I’m not?” Systems of oppression continue to work against children—despite our best intentions. This presentation will explore how grading practices, classroom routines, teaching methodologies, discipline codes and other school structures can perpetuate the kinds of exclusion that keep poor children, girls, LGBTQIA+ children, disabled children and children of color from fully accessing and benefiting from a school curriculum. We will study how inquiry/action research can be a tool that practitioners use to dismantle these structures and to change them to truly benefit all learners.

    LCF-8 — Featured
    Expanding Understanding: Engaging Dialogically with Multiple Texts and Perspectives

    Maria Nichols, Teacher, Administrator, Author, Consultant, San Diego Unified School District, CA
    Grades K-6: Our interconnected world requires the active participation of powerfully literate citizens who are able to think and talk through complex issues from a range of perspectives. This workshop will explore the ways multiple sources with varied perspectives expand engagement, expand student talk, and as a result, expand understanding. Text sets that engage students in multiple perspectives will be shared, and instructional strategies that support thinking and talking among these texts purposefully and productively emphasized.

    LCF-9 — Featured
    Talking with Children About Books (Repeat)

    Frank Serafini, Professor, Arizona State University, AZ 
    Grades 3-8: This workshop session will focus on helping students move beyond literal responses to fictional texts. A variety of discussion strategies will be presented that provide opportunities for classroom teachers to expand students’ responses to literature and reconsider the structures and supports for the discussions that occur in their classrooms.

    LCF-10 — Featured
    Leading Student-Centered Coaching

    Diane Sweeney, Lead Consultant, Diane Sweeney Consulting, CO
    Literacy Coaching: Have you ever wondered how to get more out of instructional coaching in your school? Would you like to learn how to build an effective coaching program from the ground up? It’s a familiar  story ... we hire great teachers to be coaches and then assume that their instructional background will be enough to get them started. There is so much more to developing an effective coaching model, and it begins with the school leader. Join us to learn concrete ways to define roles, set expectations for participation, and align with school improvement efforts. This session is recommended for coaches, principals, district leaders, and teachers who are interested in coaching.

    LCF-11 — Featured
    Thematically-Focused Vocabulary Instruction for Students in Grades 3-8

    Jerry Zutell, Professor Emeritus, Textbook Author, The Ohio State University, OH 
    Grades 3-8: Learn about an effective approach to vocabulary instruction for elementary and middle grade students. The Theme-Context-Roots-Reference-Review (TC3R) cycle includes a) selecting domains of student knowledge and study, b) active development of strategies for unlocking word meanings in context, c) knowledge of root word structures that connect to word meanings, d) effective use of reference and internet sources for unlocking word meanings and precision in selecting the right word for the specific context.

    LCF-12 
    Embedding Literacy into Play in Early Childhood

    Stephanie Byrd, PreK Inclusion Teacher, Boston Public Schools, MA
    Colleen Mason, PreK Inclusion Teacher, Boston Public Schools, MA 

    Grades PreK-K: Play can be a powerful lever for engaging the diverse range of learners in our Early Childhood classrooms in meaningful literacy experiences. In this session, we will explore how teachers can use purposeful play and inquiry to foster creativity and curiosity to support the social-emotional needs of our students while embedding academics and skills in ways that maintain joy.

    LCF-13 
    Wonder, Words, and Wisdom: Teaching with Kwame Alexander’s Books

    Mary Ann Cappiello, Professor, Lesley University, MA
    Erika Thulin Dawes, Professor, Lesley University, MA
    Grace Enriquez, Associate Professor, Lesley University, MA
    Katie Cunningham, Associate Professor, Manhattanville College, NY 

    Grades 5-8: Excited about hearing author and keynote speaker Kwame Alexander? Wondering about the ways that you can incorporate his work into your curriculum? Our session will provide middle school teachers with the opportunity to explore Alexander’s work in a curricular context, with an emphasis on thematic text sets. Please bring tablets or laptops and come ready to experience a diverse sampling of learning contexts.

    LCF-14 
    Inspire Writing! with Comics, Picture Books, and Graphic Novels

    Shawna Coppola, Literacy Specialist, Author, and Consultant, The Educator Collaborative, NH
    Grades 3-6: What is the difference between a comic, a graphic novel, and a picture book? How can we use an inquiry process to build curriculum in our writers’ workshop? Participants of this workshop will walk away with a solid sense of how to answer both of these questions as well as a variety of ideas for how to engage students in trying out some of the craft elements that are found within these popular, yet often undervalued genres.

    LCF-15
    Building Your Conferring Toolkit: Preparing for Conferring with Readers

    Gravity Goldberg, Author, Consultant, Gravity Goldberg, LLC, NY
    Renee Houser, Author, Consultant, Renee Houser, LLC, NY

    Grades 3-6: We often feel reluctant to try conferring conversations because there is no plan to follow. We don’t think we have the background to sit side-by-side with a reader. We fear we don’t know what to ask, what to listen for, or what to look for in order to reliably take that data and do something with it to really have an impact on the learner’s development. The truth is, we can’t plan for a conference, but we can be prepared. In this highly practical session, come with your trickiest questions and walk away with a toolkit of things you can use with students right away.

    LCF-16
    The Diversity Dilemma: Finding Diverse Books for Marginalized K-3 Students

    Carol Levine, Owner, Manager, SongLake Books, NY
    Grades K-2: Learn dimensions of diversity; learn why diversity matters even in primarily white classrooms; learn current research to justify additional expenditures for diverse reading materials; learn to avoid common pitfalls in selecting diverse materials; and, lastly, leave with a list of many companies / titles of diverse books appropriate for K-3 classroom instruction or classroom libraries.

    LCF-17
    Hit the Pause Button: Slowing Down to Get to Know our Kids as Readers & Writers

    Stephanie Noyes McSherry, Lead Learner, Merry Barn Writers' Retreat & Educational Consulting, LLC, ME
    Sandra Horrocks, Teacher, Bowdoin, ME
    Keira Ithomitis, Teacher, Brunswick, ME
    Kristen Cerami, Teacher, Portsmouth, NH

    Grades K-2: There is never enough time. It can be difficult to give ourselves permission to slow down and focus on what we know is foundational to all learning – developing strong relationships with our students, and knowing them as readers and writers. It is an ongoing cycle of observing, gathering, hypothesizing, and using what we know about our kids to teach responsively and propel our students on their own paths toward success. Join us to celebrate and share the ways we can refocus on knowing our kids, and teach responsively. Come with a student in mind and create a holistic student literacy profile.

    LCF-18
    Required Reading Reconsidered

    Afrika Afeni Mills, Senior Manager of Inclusive and Responsive Educational Practices, Better Lesson, MA 
    Monica Washington, Instructional Coach, BetterLesson, TX

    Grades 3-6: Educators who attend this session will examine the voids that may exist in their schools’ required literary canons. Session facilitators will engage participants in discussion while also providing resources and practical solutions for creating more inclusive and richer literary experiences for students.

    LCF-19
    How-To Guide to Interactive Writing: Help your Writers go from Approximating to Independence

    Gwen Quinn, Literacy Coach, Coatesville Area School District, PA
    Audrey Monte, Literacy Coach, Coatesville Area School District, PA

    Grades K-2: Come and learn how interactive writing can help your primary writers soar to new spelling independence! In this workshop, you will learn how to implement interactive writing in a K-2 classroom with ease. This quick, energetic, and collaborative instructional addition to your practice will help support those novice writers in an authentic and engaging literacy context.

    LCF-20
    Raising our Voices: Digital Tools to Enhance Student Participation

    Dr. Lindsay Yearta, Assistant Professor of Education, Winthrop University, SC
    Katie Kelly, Associate Professor of Education, Furman University, SC

    Technology and Literacy: In this session, the presenters will share a variety of digital tools that can be used to create opportunities for students to share their ideas and questions with authentic audiences within and beyond the classroom. Further, digital tools to encourage and support student activism will be discussed. Classroom examples will be shared. Please bring a device and join us to discover digital technologies that can help your students raise their voices.

  • Reading Recovery Session F | 10:30 am–12:00 pm

    RRF-1 — Featured
    Intentionality

    C.C. Bates, Director, Clemson University Reading Recovery and Early Literacy Training Center for South Carolina, SC 
    Reading Recovery: What does it mean to be intentional in our teaching and professional lives? This keynote will explore how the close observation of students links to deliberate teaching and accelerated progress.  It will also examine ways teachers can be purposeful about reflective practice and collaboration.

  • Session G | 1:30 pm–3:00 pm

    LCG-1 — Featured
    "I've Never Written So Much!" How Mentor Texts Inspire and Nurture Writers: Grades 3-8

    Jeff Anderson, Author, Portsmouth, NH
    Grades 3-8: You can’t make students write, but you can inspire them to do so. Discover and explore a few sure-fire mentor texts and strategies that will get and keep students writing. Come join a middle grade author and write, laugh, and grow.

    LCG-2 — Featured
    CAFE 2.0: Teach the Students in Front of You (Repeat)

    Gail Boushey, Author and Educator, The Daily CAFE, WA
    Allison Behne, Author and Educator, The Daily CAFE, WA

    Grades K-6: Since it is our job to teach, we benefit from committing to memory a lesson framework that is effective, flexible, differentiated, and keeps thinking at the heart, allowing our brains to have enough cognitive capacity to make decisions and mental pivots in the moment with students. Join us to learn the framework that makes this responsive teaching and student learning possible. This session will highlight our four-step plan to design and deliver effective instruction.

    LCG-3 — Featured
    Clever Writers Become Critical Readers - Writing Skills Can Transform Comprehension (Repeat)

    M. Colleen Cruz, Director of Innovation,Teachers College Reading & Writing Project, Columbia University, NY 
    Grades 3-8: Many teachers are used to taking advantage of links between reading and writing, typically introducing a genre through reading and looking to texts as mentors for writing pieces crafted later. Colleen will assert there is another way - that teaching writing first and explicitly teaching students to reflect on choices they make as writers are powerful tools for teaching critical reading comprehension. When students, as captains of their writing, start to recognize the tricks of the trade in the texts they read, their reading comprehension becomes more active and nuanced.

    LCG-4 — Featured
    What We Read in Books, We Read in The World

    Cornelius Minor, Author, Educational Consultant, NY
    Grades K-8: People often say that books make us better people or that writing can change the world. This session will take a very close look at our role as educators in ensuring that this happens. Just like we cannot leave the teaching of literacy skills to chance, we cannot simply hope for a better world. We teach for one. In this session, we will work to name the skills, plan the lessons, gather the resources, and practice the methods that help children to learn and practice critical thinking skills in the literacy classroom and then to transfer those skills to their lived experience in the world.

    LCG-5 — Featured
    The Power of Purposeful Talk: Exploring and Building Dialogic Classrooms

    Maria Nichols, Teacher, Administrator, Author, Consultant, San Diego Unified School District, CA 
    Grades K-6: The ability to talk purposefully and productively with others is foundational to learning. But, what is purposeful talk, and how do we teach in ways that enable talk - and children - to flourish? This workshop explores dialogic classrooms, emphasizing processes that support students in using talk to construct bold ideas and understandings. The changing role of the teacher will be considered, with examples of facilitation strategies that support student’s efforts.

    LCG-6 — Featured
    Word Detectives: Using Word Structure, Origin, and History to Increase Student’s Vocabulary

    Jerry Zutell, Professor Emeritus, Textbook Author, The Ohio State University, OH
    Grades 3-8: Build your understanding of when, where, and how English words have entered the language and how to use this information to plan instructional activities that stimulate students’ interest and build their academic vocabularies. In addition, join a discussion of how the systematic relationship between large classes of current English and Spanish words can be used to support the vocabulary growth of Spanish-speaking L2 speakers.

    LCG-7
    Yes, They Can! Joyful Learning and High Expectations for our Youngest Learners

    Grace Choi, Literacy Collaborative Coach, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA
    Grades K-2: How do teachers develop reading and writing identities in our youngest learners while still honoring them as young children? During this session teachers will learn about creating classroom structures and routines that allow for joyful and meaningful experiences within authentic reading and writing practices. We will explore ways to build engagement throughout the balanced literacy framework while also holding high expectations for our students as growing readers and writers.

    LCG-8
    Infusing Diverse Picture Books in Your ELA/Literacy Teaching

    Grace Enriquez, Associate Professor of Language and Literacy, Lesley University, MA 
    Children's Literature and Authors: Given the capacity for literature to create powerful learning experiences for children, what does it mean to include diverse picture books in our literacy teaching? In this workshop, attendees will consider authors, illustrators, databases, book review sites, and various kinds of diverse picture books and pedagogical approaches available to educators. Time will be given to explore diverse picture books, both classic and recently published, to consider their utility for teaching.

    LCG-9
    Annotation and Agency: Close Reading in the Primary Grades

    Alice Ensley, District Literacy Coordinator, Dalton Public Schools, GA
    Grades K-2: Why do many readers begin to struggle as they encounter increasingly complex texts?  This session will explore the increased vocabulary demands at upper levels and propose shifts that can be made in our primary grades to prepare readers to be successful in these texts.  This session will demonstrate close reading in grades K-2 and connect those strategies to guided reading instruction. Specific vocabulary solving mini lessons will also be shared.

    LCG-10
    Emotionally Responsive Coaching

    Jillian Fountain, Intermediate/Middle Grades Trainer, Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA
    Literacy Coaches: Professional interactions and relationships contribute to educators’ understandings of our work, our identities, and our perceptions of colleagues. Coaching conversations have an affective component that impacts the actions of each participant, and as a result, the professional learning that emerges. Since emotions are key to how professional knowledge is developed, we will explore the emotional supports necessary for effective coaching.

    LCG-11
    Assessment to Empowerment: Using the BAS as a Catalyst for Change

    Angela Kennedy, Curriculum Coordinator, Eagle Mt. Saginaw ISD, TX
    Robin Griffith, Associate Professor, Texas Christian University, TX

    Administrators and School Leaders: Too often teachers administer assessments for the purpose of reporting reading level data at the district level but that does not shape instruction. In this session, we present one district’s story of how a sustained system of support and ongoing collaboration at all levels empowered teachers and campuses to use data differently.  Teachers examine the BAS results to inform instruction far beyond the guided reading table. Videos, artifacts, and hands-on work will be shared.

    LCG-12
    Beyond Formulas: Research-based Approaches for Teaching Real-World Writing

    Leslie Laud, Instructor, Bank Street College of Education, MA 
    Grades 3-6: Learn the latest research on how to raise motivation, foster self-regulation and improve the quality of student writing, in a workshop setting focused on text-based and real world writing. Receive resources and ideas you can use immediately to help your writers become more effective at using the writing process in personalized, authentic ways to achieve their purposes.

    LCG-13
    Fostering Language Development

    Sara Lazrow, Manager of Content Development, Children's Literacy Initiative, PA
    Susan Smith, Manager of Content Development, Children's Literacy Initiative, PA

    Grades PreK-K: Children’s oral language development has a strong impact on their reading and writing skills. In this session we will learn explicit strategies to encourage talk and deepen language skills in our classrooms. We’ll learn about the components of oral language: phonology, semantics, syntax and pragmatics and look at ways to create a language rich classroom environment through read alouds, songs and rhymes, collaborative conversations and play.

    LCG-14
    Authentic Inquiry in K-2 Classrooms through Genius Hour

    Mary Alicia Lyons, K-2 Literacy Coach, Chapel Hill Carrboro City Schools, NC 
    Grades K-2: Imagine a framework that integrates reading, writing, speaking and listening, technology, student voice and choice, and collaboration. Genius Hour (GH) fits that bill! In GH, students develop open-ended wonder questions and research them through inquiry learning.  Participants will learn about instructional strategies to successfully support implementing GH. In addition, we’ll learn about apps that support research and reflection, explore GH resources, view videos of the work in action and see GH final projects.

    LCG-15
    Developing Cohesive Genre Studies for Middle School Readers and Writers

    Patty McGee, Lead Literacy Consultant, Gravity Goldbert, LLC, NJ 
    Grades 5-8: Why is it that Middle School literacy lessons sometimes time-warp into dusty practices of whole class texts written by a finite set of authors and writing five-paragraph responses? Mid-century modern may work for furniture but not for instruction—there is a better way! Together let’s create an irresistible reading and writing genre study that will have your middle schoolers connecting with zeal. This isn’t about tossing out the literary canon but playing in the intellectual sandbox with many other texts and voices and genres.

    LCG-16
    Integrating Social Studies/Literacy: Importance of Talk and Building Collective Ideas

    Maggie Moon, K-5 Literacy Liaison, The School at Columbia University, NY
    Danielle Morris, Grade 3 Lead Teacher, The School at Columbia University, NY 

    Grades 2-6: Integrating the teaching of social studies, science and literacy makes learning relevant and accessible to children. By teaching students to build their discourse during Read Aloud and Research Clubs, we invigorate the learning in all classrooms and make the teaching of content areas come to life. Engaging students in centers opens up possibilities for understanding the past and present, and encourages students to draw connections between history topics, science concepts and new ideas.

    LCG-17
    Observe and Respond: Teaching for Shifts in Reading Processing

    Chrisie Moritz, Literacy Collaborative Coach, Consultant, Author, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA
    Grades K-2: Effective, responsive teaching is dependent upon our ability to observe and analyze reading behaviors then respond in a way that engineers a shift in how readers process texts. Join me as we use a variety of student examples to refine our observational lenses and expand our repertoire of facilitative language and moves that support readers with efficient processing.

    LCG-18
    Visual Literacy: An Alternate Path to Comprehension

    Eleanor Papazoglou, Teaching Lecturer and Literacy Consultant, Plymouth State University, NH
    Grades 3-6: For learners who struggle with reading and writing the visuals they encounter in texts are more than just pictures to look at or drawings to "decorate" writing. They are an integral part of reading and writing instruction. The visuals learners encounter in literature are learning and thinking tools that foster the development of comprehension. In this session the focus is on intentional, explicit, and differentiated instruction to scaffold the use of visuals in the meaning making process.

    LCG-19
    Coaching in the Middle: Supporting Disciplinary Literacy Learning

    Lisa White, K-12 English Language Arts and Library Media Coordinator, Plymouth Public Schools, MA
    Jacklyn Gervais, Middle School Literacy Coach, Plymouth Public Schools, MA
    Sarah Grant, Middle School Literacy Coach, Plymouth Public Schools, MA 

    Literacy Coaching: Middle grade teachers face increasingly complex demands: new content standards, literacy goals, SEL skills, and more.  This session will review the difference between content-area literacy and disciplinary literacy and how merging the expertise of a content specialist with the experience and background of a literacy coach can enhance instructional practices and increase student achievement.  Time will be given for modeling, guided practice, and independent practice of approaches and strategies presented.

  • Reading Recovery Session G | 1:30 pm–3:00 pm

    RRG-1 — Featured
    Maximizing the Power of the Cut-Up Story in Building a Strong Processing System (Repeat)

    Mary Rosser, Director, UTC for Reading Recovery and Comprehensive Literacy, University of Maine, ME 
    Reading Recovery: This session explores the power of the cut-up story in building upon and extending the strategic activity and processing power developed by students during the process of reading writing across the lesson.

    RRG-2
    Rediscovering Roaming: Expanding the Teacher’s Known

    Matthew Morrison, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, University of Maine, ME 
    Reading Recovery: During roaming, it is the goal of every Reading Recovery teacher to gain as much  information and insight about a child as possible. But what can we do to ensure we achieve this with all children? Using James Schnug’s 2015 article “Promoting Discovery During Roaming Around the Known” as a touchstone, we will explore how to maximize our opportunities to cultivate the mindset of tentativeness and sensitive observation in ourselves. If our students are to accelerate, we must remain open, contingent, and alert and throughout the entire lesson series. Roaming is the gift Clay gave us to rediscover this mindset and practice it moment by moment so as to carry it forward when lessons begin.

Workshop Schedule
Questions
If you have any questions, please contact the Literacy for All Conference team